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Aurora over Scotland (330 files)

Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights displays photographed taken over Aberdeeshire in Scotland since 1989 covering some 350 events with arc, rays, coronas with a wide rnage of shapes and colours
Deeside Aurora aucf14103jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green arc rays faint November 2003 north Deeside Aberdeenshire photographed near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen in the evening of 22nd November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. This followed a major storm on the 20th which with hindsight it was the biggest I have since on Deeside to date, 2018. This set of digital photos were taken from 21.33.31hrsUT for 18secs and these cf141 digital photos were taken at 1600ISO. The 8 photos in this cf141 sequence were taken in the space of about 20mins and followed the cf140 sequence taken in the early hours of the 21st. This photo showing early stages of a display with bright arc and first signs of rays developing slightly west of due North. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 second mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, arc, yellow, green, red, rays, trees, silhouetted, average, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Pleiades, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, morning, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213981jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Orion Pleiades Corona green zenith celestial wings from Tomnaverie Bronze Age stone circle site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south the last of the digital photos was taken at 00.18.10hrsUT for 10secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213980jhp 
 Scotland flanker monolith Aurora Borealis Orion Pleiades Corona green zenith wings Tomnaverie Bronze Age stone circle site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 00.17.20hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213979jhp 
 Scotland flanker Stones Aurora Borealis south Pleiades Corona green zenith wings Tomnaverie Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 00.16.23hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213978jhp 
 Scottish flanker above Aurora Borealis south Orion Pleiades Corona zenith wings Tomnaverie Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 00.15.11hrsUT for 17secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213977jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis south Orion Pleiades Tarland Tomnaverie Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 00.14.32hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213975jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis above flanker red colours rays North Tarland Tomnaverie Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the north in the direction of Tarland was taken at 00.12.47hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213974jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona red colours rays Plough North Tarland Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the north in the direction of Tarland was taken at 00.12.18hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213973jhp 
 Scotttish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona arms colours rays Tarland Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the north west in the direction of Morven was taken at 00.00.36hrsUT for 14secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213970jhp 
 Deeside Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona dome rays Tarland Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the north west in the direction of Tarland was taken at 23.58.42hrsUT for 15secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213967jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona rays recumbent Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.56.31hrsUT for 12secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213959jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona red green rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.27.22hrsUT for 20secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213956jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis corona building red green rays dome stone Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.25.12hrsUT for 15secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213955jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis corona building red green rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.24.10hrsUT for 15secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213954jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis sweeping red green rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.23.29hrsUT for 14secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213952jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis sweeping red rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.21.36hrsUT for 19secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213951jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis sweeping arms Stars rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.20.58hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213949jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Northern Lights Corona Orion Stars red rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.19.04hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213947jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona Orion Stars rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.15.05hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213946jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona activity rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.13.18hrsUT for 15secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213943jhp 
 British Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona dome zenith Pleiades Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.08.44hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213942jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona dome Pleiades Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.08.14hrsUT for 10secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213941jhp 
 Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona Orion flanker red ray Tarland Deeside winter Scotland Tomnaverie recumbent and flankers of the Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo was taken at 22.57.10hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213940jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle RSC Aurora Borealis Corona west red ray Tarland Deeside Scotland Tomnaverie recumbent and flankers of the Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo was taken at 22.56.13hrsUT for 12secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213939jhp 
 Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona Orion red ray Tomnaverie Deeside Scotland recumbent and flankers of the Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo was taken at 22.55.46hrsUT for 11secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213937jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona Orion red ray Deeside Scotland Tomnaverie recumbent and flankers of the Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo was taken at 22.34.58hrsUT for 8secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137034jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona crown red purple nitrogen rays treetops west Aberdeenshire Deeside last digital photograph taken over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.15.02hrsUT for 15secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137033jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona crown red wings sweeping rays treetops west Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.13.56hrsUT for 17secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137032jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish colours east car headlights arms Corona red Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed from Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.12.56hrsUT for 16secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137031jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish colours Corona centre crown red rays treetops west Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.12.12hrsUT for 17secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137030jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish colourful Corona zenith red rays treetops west Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.11.32hrsUT for 17secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137029jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland colours Corona red rays treetops west Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.10.48hrsUT for 16secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137027jhp 
 Aurora Borealis red rays Scotland Torphins colours eastwards car street lights Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed from Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.09.12hrsUT for 13secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, telephone pole, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137026jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish winter Torphins colours east car street lights Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed from Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.08.42hrsUT for 11secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137025jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Northern Lights November Corona red green rays colours west trees silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.07.58hrsUT for 15secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137023jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona red wings centre colours west pine tree silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.06.50hrsUT for 12secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137022jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish winter east car headlights red rays colours Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed from Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.06.10hrsUT for 12secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Torphins, Glassel, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137021jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish winter November Corona zenith red wings centre colours west trees silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.05.25hrsUT for 15secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137020jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish winter display Corona zenith green red wings powerful colourful west trees silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.04.54hrsUT for 13secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137019jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona zenith green red wings powerful colourful west trees silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.04.12hrsUT for 13secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137018jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona zenith red wings centre power colours west trees silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.03.46hrsUT for 8secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137016jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona centre green pink wings west above trees silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.02.16hrsUT for 13secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137015jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona zenith green arms west trees silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.02.16hrsUT for 13secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137014jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona zenith green rays forest silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.01.28hrsUT for 14secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf137013jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona display red green rays forest silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 18.00.52hrsUT for 18secs and these cf137 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, possibly realising with this new card that the previous 100ISO was far to low. The 19 photos in this cf137 sequence were taken in the space of 15 mins as photos were being taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf13610jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona red wings forest trees silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 17.46.34hrsUT for 19secs and these cf136 digital photos were taken at 100ISO, which was probably a mistake, but later in the cf137 photos it was set at 800ISO possibly as I felt the power justified going for a finer noise level to my usual 1600ISO.. The faint CCD bars suggest even with the long exposure this photo was underexposed. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf13609jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona display red wings forest silhouette Aberdeenshire Deeside photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This digital photo was taken at 17.45.56hrsUT for 19secs and these cf136 digital photos were taken at 100ISO, which was probably a mistake, but later in the cf137 it set at 800ISO possibly as I felt the power justified going for a finer noise level to my usual 1600ISO. The faint CCD bars suggest even with the long exposure this photo was underexposed. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Red Corona aucf13601jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Corona Deeside display red wings west Aberdeenshire Scotland photographed over Ord Fundlie forest near Kincardine O'Neil on Royal Deeside west of Aberdeen and unusually this started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003, 25 miles west of Aberdeen. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 and it continued all evening with a sequence of later photos taken over the Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland from 22.00 hrs until after midnight. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display. This first digital photo was taken at 17.33.02hrsUT for 24secs and these cf136 digital photos were taken at 100ISO, which was probably a mistake, but later in the cf137 photos it was set at 800ISO possibly as I felt the power justified going for a finer noise level to my usual 1600ISO. The faint CCD bars suggest even with the long exposure this photo was underexposed. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, wings, forest, trees, silhouetted, powerful, colours, colourful, descending, winter, Ord, Fundlie, Kincardine, O’Neil, Torphins, car, headlights, lights, commuters, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, November, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, south, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13119jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish strong Corona zenith shape green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.25.32hrsUT for 13secs, showing green and red oxygen rays forming the classic corona zenith or crown above the cottage roof looking southwards the colour chnage indicating the strength of the display increasing. This was a short exposure 13 as against 20 secs and very faint CCd structure lines are visible and indication of an under exposure. This was the last of the digital photos taken. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25.32 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13116jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona zenith centre shape green rays over cottage Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.23.31hrsUT for 20secs, showing green oxygen rays forming the classic corona zenith or crown above the cottage roof looking southwards. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13114jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona zenith forming green rays overhead Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.22.01hrsUT for 23secs, showing green oxygen rays forming the corona zenith or crown above the cottage roof looking southwards. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13113jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green rays shapes weird ghostlike south Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.20.56hrsUT for 25secs, showing green oxygen rays and shapes above the cottage roof looking southwards and forming weird shapes. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13112jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green rays clouds eastwards car lights Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.19.57hrsUT for 21secs, showing green oxygen rays sweeping down from the east visible through gaps in the clouds and with the street lights of Torphins and car headlights on the main road from Banchory. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, car lights, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13110jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green rays clouds east Torphins lights Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.16.29hrsUT for 19secs, showing green oxygen rays sweeping down from the east visible through gaps in the clouds and with the street lights of Torphins and car headlights on the main road from Banchory. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13109jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish corona huge green rays west wings Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.03.27hrsUT for 16secs, showing green oxygen rays sweeping down from the west a precursor of another corona strength display with the rays appearing suspended in the celestial heights with no sign of an arc. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13108jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern Lights Scottish corona green red rays west fan Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.02.53hrsUT for 20secs, showing green and red oxygen rays sweeping down from the west a precursor of another corona strength display with the rays appearing suspended in the celestial heights with no sign of an arc. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, west, fan, sweeping, suspended, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13106jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern Lights Scotland corona green red rays sweeping east Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.02.11hrsUT for 18secs, showing green and red oxygen rays sweeping down from the east a precursor of another corona strength display with the rays appearing suspended in the celestial heights with no sign of an arc. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13105jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish coronal glow south green red Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 23.01.36hrsUT for 17secs, showing green and red oxygen background glow a precursor of another corona strength display looking southwards which was an indication of the strength of the display. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, cornal, glow, background, strong, southwards, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13102jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Pleiades East green red rays rooftop Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This digital photo was taken at 22.59.03hrsUT for 20secs, showing green and red oxygen rays and the start of another corona strength display looking eastwards. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Corona Forming aucf13101jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Cassiopeia Pleiades East green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This first digital photo was taken at 22.58.22hrsUT for 20secs, showing green and red oxygen rays and the start of another corona strength display looking eastwards. The cf131 digital sequence, starting at 22.58.22, shows the continuing activity following on from the very active night of the 29th/30th with another Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 23.25 which was frustrated by complete cloud cover and rain. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 21.50hrsUT on the evening of the 30th when the extensive cloud cover cleared. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 21.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12838jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona zenith green red rays Orion South stars cottage roof Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This last photo was taken at 02.28.39hrsUT for 23secs, showing strong red oxygen background light looking southwards marked by Orion in its winter position to the north and a very rare position in which to see Aurora displays at the end of this digital sequence and when cloud cover stopped further viewing. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12837jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green red rays North Plough clouds increasing Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.27.34hrsUT for 24secs, showing green and red oxygen rays looking North with increasing cloud cover starting to blank out the Aurora display. The Plough is above gap between the two tree tops. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12836jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green red rays North Torphins lights Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.26.26hrsUT for 22secs, showing green and red oxygen rays looking North eastwards past with the street lights of nearby Torphins village in the lower right and The Plough slightly above. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, street, lights, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12835jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green red rays North Plough Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.25.29hrsUT for 20secs, showing green and red oxygen rays looking Northwards past The Plough, Big Dipper or Ursa Major stars dead centre of the frame. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12834jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona zenith green rays west Pleiades birch Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.24.39hrsUT for 24secs, showing green zenith arms and strong background red oxygen forming another coronal zenith or crown looking south westwards with Pleiades visible in top of the tree. What is not recorded in this still image is the degree of movement around the centre with the swirling arms of the rays as the display continues to form. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12833jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona zenith green centre Orion South stars cottage roof Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.23.58hrsUT for 20secs, showing green zenith or crown and some red oxygen backdrop looking southwards marked by Orion in its winter position to the north and a very rare position in which to see Aurora displays. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12832jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona zenith green red rays Orion South stars cottage roof Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.22.56hrsUT for 20secs, showing green and some red oxygen rays looking southwards marked by Orion in its winter position to the north and a very rare position in which to see Aurora displays. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12831jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Corona westwards green red rays clouds Scotland Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.21.59hrsUT for 23secs, showing green and strong red oxygen sweeping rays as a corona fades looking westwards. What is not recorded in this still image is the degree of movement with the swirling arms of the rays as the display continue. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12829jhp 
 Aurora British Corona arms westwards green red rays clouds Cassiopeia Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.18.29hrsUT for 20secs, showing green and strong red oxygen sweeping rays of a coronal zenith or crown looking south westwards with Cassiopeia visible towards thye top centre. What is not recorded in this still image is the degree of movement around the centre with the swirling arms of the rays as the display continues to form. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12828jhp 
 Aurora Scottish Coronal wings overhead green red rays clouds Cassiopeia Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.17.50hrsUT for 20secs, showing green and strong red oxygen sweeping rays of a forming coronal zenith or crown looking westwards with Cassiopeia visible towards top of the frame. What is not recorded in this still image is the degree of movement around the centre with the swirling arms of the rays as the display continues to form. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12825jhp 
 Aurora Scotland Corona centre overhead tree green rays clouds west Pleiades Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.14.50hrsUT for 23secs, showing green and strong red oxygen sweeping rays of a forming coronal zenith or crown looking south westwards with Pleiades visible in top of the tree. What is not recorded in this still image is the degree of movement around the centre with the swirling arms of the rays as the display continues to form. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof, silver, birch
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12824jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona crown tree green red rays west Pleiades Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.14.50hrsUT for 23secs, showing green and strong red oxygen sweeping rays of a forming coronal zenith or crown looking south westwards with Pleiades visible in top of the tree. What is not recorded in this still image is the degree of movement around the centre with the swirling arms of the rays as the display continues to form. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12819jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona zenith green red sweeping rays west Pleiades Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 02.10.49hrsUT for 23secs, showing green and strong red oxygen sweeping rays of a forming coronal zenith or crown looking south westwards with Pleiades visible in top of the tree. What is not recorded in this still image is the degree of movement around the centre with the swirling arms of the rays as the display continues to form. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12818jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona zenith green red sweeping rays west Pleiades Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.55.02hrsUT for 24secs, showing green and strong red oxygen sweeping rays of a forming coronal zenith or crown looking south westwards with Pleiades visible in the lower quadrant. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12816jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland lights green red rays Orion South stars cottage roof Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.53.37hrsUT for 24secs, showing green and some red oxygen rays looking southwards marked by Orion in its winter position to the north and a very rare position in which to see Aurora displays. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12814jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green red sweeping large rays west Cassiopeia Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.51.45hrsUT for 27secs, showing green and strong red oxygen sweeping rays looking westwards with Cassiopeia on its side in upper centre. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12813jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green red sweeping large rays east cottage roof Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.50.49hrsUT for 23secs, showing green and strong red oxygen sweeping rays looking eastwards. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12812jhp 
 Aurora Northern Lights British Scotland green red rays Orion South clouds cottage roof Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.50.05hrsUT for 25secs, showing green and some red oxygen rays looking southwards marked by Orion in its winter position to the north and a very rare position in which to see Aurora displays. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, uprights, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12811jhp 
 Aurora Northern Lights Scotland green red rays Orion South stars cottage roof Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.49.13hrsUT for 21secs, showing green and some red oxygen rays looking southwards marked by Orion in its winter position to the north and a very rare position in which to see Aurora displays. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12810jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green red rays Orion South stars cottage roof Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.48.14hrsUT for 29secs, showing green and some red oxygen rays looking southwards marked by Orion in its winter position to the north and a very rare position in which to see Aurora displays. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera, cottage, roof
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12809jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green red oxygen rays Plough North stars clouds Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.47.30hrsUT for 23secs, showing green and some red oxygen rays looking northwards marked by Ursa Major or The Plough in its winter position to the north. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12808jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish red green rays Plough North Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.46.44hrsUT for 27secs showing mainly green and red oxygen rays in the early stages of a developing Corona looking northwards marked by Ursa Major or The Plough in its winter position to the north. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12807jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish display rays Plough North stars clouds Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.45.55hrsUT for 23secs showing mainly green oxygen rays looking northwards marked by Ursa Major or The Plough in its winter position to the north. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12806jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland red green rays cloud gap stars west Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.45.05hrsUT for 25secs showing mainly green oxygen rays through gaps in the cloud cover. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12804jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish forest red green rays cloudy west Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.42.06hrsUT for 23secs showing mainly green oxygen rays looking westwards. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12801jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green rays clouds Plough North Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the south. This photo was taken at 01.39.28hrsUT for 23secs showing mainly green oxygen rays with a suggestion of red looking northwards. The cf128 digital sequence, starting at 01.39.28 of the continuing activity continued well into the morning of the 30th October when clouds cleared again, perseverance pays, allowing a third major Corona to be viewed through until the last frame at 02.28.39 which in the course of displays I have seen was unusual to continue as long as this. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT on the evening of the 29th towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover and further slide film preceded this digital sequence from 00.56 to 01.04 hrs UT on scanned slides AB036series. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my first digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12723jhp 
 Aurora Scotland Deeside Corona display green red rays zenith clouds colour Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.49.26hrsUT for 25secs showing green and red oxygen rays at the centre or zenith of the corona looking directly upwards over Royal Deeside with some increasing cloud and strong wind. The cf127 session of which this is the last frame, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12722jhp 
 Aurora Northern Lights Scotland deeside Corona green red rays zenith centre colour Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.48.42hrsUT for 22secs showing green and red oxygen rays dropping like a huge wings from the centre or zenith of the corona looking directly upwards over Royal Deeside with some swiftly passing cloud. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12721jhp 
 Aurora Northern Lights Scottish Corona green red rays zenith crown colourful westwards Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.48.01hrsUT for 15secs showing green and red oxygen rays dropping like a huge wings from the centre or zenith of the corona looking directly upwards over Royal Deeside. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12720jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona green red rays huge fan colourful westwards Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.25.38hrsUT for 28secs showing green and red oxygen rays dropping like a huge fan from the start of a corona looking to west of north over Royal Deeside. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12719jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona display rays fan westwards Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.24.34hrsUT for 24secs showing green and red oxygen rays dropping like a huge fan from the start of a corona looking to the west over Royal Deeside. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12718jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona display rays fan clouds Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.23.22hrsUT for 23secs showing green and red oxygen rays dropping like a huge fan from the start of a corona looking upwards. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12713jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland red green oxygen rays clouds west gaps Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.07.23hrsUT for 22secs showing mainly green red oxygen rays through the clouds looking westwards. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12712jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green red Northern Lights rays clouds northwards Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.06.33hrsUT for 21 secs showing mainly green oxygen arc light with green and red oxygen gas rays appearing through gaps in the clouds looking northwards. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12710jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland strong green red rays clouds openings bright stars northwards Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.03.38hrsUT for 38 secs showing mainly green oxygen arc light with strong green oxygen gas rays appearing through gaps in the clouds looking northwards. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12709jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland display strong green rays clouds openings stars northwards Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.03hrsUT for 20secs showing mainly green oxygen arc light with strong rays appearing through gaps in the clouds looking northwards. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12705jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish display faint rays clouds cover gaps northwards Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 00.00.6hrsUT for 22secs showing mainly green oxygen arc light with very faint rays appearing through gaps in the clouds looking northwards. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12702jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland display clouds covered gaps north Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.58.09hrsUT for 19secs showing yellow green oxygen gas backlighting extensive cloud cover to the North. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Cloudy Display aucf12701jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish display rays clouds covered gaps Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 into the morning of the 30th at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 23.56.52hrsUT for 20secs showing yellow green oxygen faint ray visible through a cloud gap looking northwards. The cf127 session, the second digital set taken after an hour of cloud cover and rain the first photos show the impact of cloud blocking out even a major Aurora display. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October when clear skies allowed a second major Corona to be viewed on the last frame at 00.49.26. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, clouds, extensive, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12618jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona green rays clouds westwards Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.30.43hrsUT for 17secs showing mainly green oxygen rays descending from the corona through increasing cloud cover looking westwards. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12615jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish autumn Corona Coronal display green red rays zenith fanlike overhead Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.28.40hrsUT for 20 secs showing mainly green oxygen rays from the centre of the Corona fanning downwards like monster wings but sadly not showing the subtle movements continuously going on. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13 mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12614jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish autumn Corona green rays zenith fanlike descending Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.27.45hrsUT for 16secs showing mainly green oxygen rays from the centre of the Corona fanning downwards like monster wings but sadly not showing the subtle movements continuously going on. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13 mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12613jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish autumnal Corona green rays spread fan huge Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.26.50hrsUT for 14secs showing mainly green oxygen rays from the centre of the Corona fanning downwards like monster wings but sadly not showing the subtle movements continuously going on. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12612jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona green rays spread fan celestial Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.25.04hrsUT for 12secs showing mainly green oxygen rays from the centre of the Corona fanning downwards like monster wings but sadly not showing the subtle movements continuously going on. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12608jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona green rays westwards colourful arc Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.23.44hrsUT for 25secs showing mainly green oxygen rays descending from the corona and ascending from the strong active arc on the right looking westwards. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12607jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Corona zenith crown green rays spread Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.23.07hrsUT for 12secs showing mainly green oxygen rays from the centre of the Corona viewed directly overhead but sadly not showing the subtle movements continuously going on. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12606jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Corona zenith centre above green rays colours north Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.22.17hrsUT for 22secs showing mainly green oxygen rays from the centre of the Corona directly overhead. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12605jhp 
 Aurora Northern Lights arc streaming active green rays vivid Plough colours north Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.21.19hrsUT for 26secs showing mainly green oxygen rays from a very active arc with streaming towards the north marked by The Plough dead centre. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12604jhp 
 Aurora Borealis October arc streaming active green rays colours north Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.20.39hrsUT for 21secs showing mainly green oxygen rays from a very active arc with streaming towards the north. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12603jhp 
 Aurora Borealis autumn Scotland corona zenith crown centre Cassiopeia red green rays colourful Deeside Aberdeenshire photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.18.45hrsUT for 18secs showing red and green rays surounding a Corona crown or zenith over Crooktree roof towards the east. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12602jhp 
 Aurora Borealis autumn corona zenith red green rays Pleiades colourful Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.18.11hrsUT for 16secs showing red and green rays descending from a Corona crown or zenith over Crooktree roof towards the east. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora Corona Display aucf12601jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish autumn corona zenith rays colours Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland photos taken on the evening of the 29th October, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking from the east to the west. This photo was taken at 22.17.37hrsUT for 16secs showing red and green rays descending at the start of a Corona crown or zenith over Crooktree roof towards the east. The cf126, the first digital set taken, was 13 frames over 13mins, illustrating how busy you can be when a full display is ongoing, photographing from east to west and directly overhead. The display continued throughout the evening into the morning of the 30th October. Photos were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film started at around 20.15hrs UT towards the west visible through gaps in the extensive cloud cover. This photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera, at maximum ISO of 1600 using a Sigma 16mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were some of my earliest digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, corona, zenith, crown, green, red, rays, descending, autumn, Torphins, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, 2003, October, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, east, west, cottage, chimney, trees, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 16mm Fisheye, earliest, digital, camera
Aurora First Digital auSM3916jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish red North waning winter March 2003 Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the morning of the 30th March 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.35hrsUT showing a waning display behind treetop aligned North and was taken at the end of the second evening’s activity after I stopped using slide film around 23.40hrs UT. This photo was taken with a Fuji Finepix S2 digital camera, the first time I used a digital camera for Aurora photography and a major departure from the years of using 35mm slide film. It was set at an ISO of 1600 to match the same sensitivity used for slide film, push developing 400asa Fuji to 1600asa with exposures set around the 20 second mark and lens aperture of f2.8 and the quality results i.e. noise factor was better than a corresponding grain pattern with pushed slide film. This particular photo was exposed for 11 secs with a 19mm focal length. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2003, March, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, Fuji, Finepix, S2Pro, DSLR, digital, camera, earliest
Aurora First Digital auSM3915jhp 
 Aurora display Scotland clouds cover decreasing winter March 2003 Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the morning of the 30th March 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.34hrsUT showing a waning display behind increasing cloud cover and was taken at the end of the second evening’s activity after I stopped using slide film around 23.40hrs UT. This photo was taken with a Fuji Finepix S2 digital camera, the first time I used a digital camera for Aurora photography and a major departure from the years of using 35mm slide film. It was set at an ISO of 1600 to match the same sensitivity used for slide film, push developing 400asa Fuji to 1600asa with exposures set around the 20 second mark and lens aperture of f2.8 and the quality results i.e. noise factor was better than a corresponding grain pattern with pushed slide film. This particular photo was exposed for 23 secs with a 19mm focal length. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2003, March, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, Fuji, Finepix, S2Pro, DSLR, digital, camera, earliest
Aurora First Digital auSM3913jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland clouds active rays arc winter March 2003 Cassiopeia Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 30th March 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.30.30hrsUT showing strong patches of green arc with some strong ray activity developing and was taken at the end of the second evening’s activity after I stopped using slide film around 23.40hrs UT. This photo was taken with a Fuji Finepix S2 digital camera, the first time I used a digital camera for Aurora photography and a major departure from the years of using 35mm slide film. It was set at an ISO of 1600 to match the same sensitivity used for slide film, push developing 400asa Fuji to 1600asa with exposures set around the 20 second mark and lens aperture of f2.8 and the quality results i.e. noise factor was better than a corresponding grain pattern with pushed slide film. This particular photo was exposed for 16 secs with a 19mm focal length. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2003, March, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, Fuji, Finepix, S2Pro, DSLR, digital, camera, earliest
Aurora First Digital auSM3912jhp 
 Aurora display Cassiopeia Scottish cloud moving rays winter green arc March 2003 Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 30th March 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.30.12hrsUT showing strong patches of green arc with some strong ray activity developing and was taken at the end of the second evening’s activity after I stopped using slide film around 23.40hrs UT. This photo was taken with a Fuji Finepix S2 digital camera, the first time I used a digital camera for Aurora photography and a major departure from the years of using 35mm slide film. It was set at an ISO of 1600 to match the same sensitivity used for slide film, push developing 400asa Fuji to 1600asa with exposures set around the 20 second mark and lens aperture of f2.8 and the quality results i.e. noise factor was better than a corresponding grain pattern with pushed slide film. This particular photo was exposed for 16 secs with a 19mm focal length. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2003, March, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, Fuji, Finepix, S2Pro, DSLR, digital, camera, earliest
Aurora First Digital auSM3903jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland cloud moving rays winter March 2003 Cassiopeia Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 30th March 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.24hrsUT showing strong patches of green arc and a hint of some ray activity developing and was taken at the end of the second evening’s activity after I stopped using slide film around 23.40hrs UT. This photo was taken with a Fuji Finepix S2 digital camera, the first time I used a digital camera for Aurora photography and a major departure from the years of using 35mm slide film. It was set at an ISO of 1600 to match the same sensitivity used for slide film, push developing 400asa Fuji to 1600asa with exposures set around the 20 second mark and lens aperture of f2.8 and the quality results i.e. noise factor was better than a corresponding grain pattern with pushed slide film. This particular photo was exposed for 11 secs with a 19mm focal length. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2003, March, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, Fuji, Finepix, S2Pro, DSLR, digital, camera, earliest
Aurora First Digital auSM3907jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland cloud moving red north winter March 2003 Cassiopeia Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 30th March 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.27hrsUT showing strong patches of green arc and a hint of some red ray activity developing over a tree top on a north bearing and was taken at the end of the second evening’s activity after I stopped using slide film around 23.40hrs UT. This photo was taken with a Fuji Finepix S2 digital camera, the first time I used a digital camera for Aurora photography and a major departure from the years of using 35mm slide film. It was set at an ISO of 1600 to match the same sensitivity used for slide film, push developing 400asa Fuji to 1600asa with exposures set around the 20 second mark and lens aperture of f2.8 and the quality results i.e. noise factor was better than a corresponding grain pattern with pushed slide film. This particular photo was exposed for 11 secs with a 19mm focal length. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2003, March, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, Fuji, Finepix, S2Pro, DSLR, digital, camera, earliest
Deeside Aurora au02736jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish display Cassiopeia rays winter February 2002 Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of the 6th February, 2002 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.40hrsUT showing strong patches with ray activity and the constellation Cassiopeia clearly visible top lefthand area, with activity stopping soon after this photo, the display having started with a low grade arc around midnight. The film numbering of 2001 was that the previous Aurora display covered was in November 2001 with this February display being the first recorded in 2002. This photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP processed for a 1600asa rating using a Nikon FG20, 28mm f2.8 lens wide open with many exposures manually around 20 seconds because of the lower light levels. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2002, February, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 35mm, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP, RSP-434, exposed, time, long, Nikon, FG20
Comet Hyakutake au9667jhp 
 Comet Hyakutake April Aurora display 1996 spring Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 14th April 1996 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 23.55BSThrs between Kincardine O’Neil and Torphins on Deeside with Cassiopeia sitting off to the right quarter a spring marker for the northern sky. The Comet is to the left of bottom centre with its tail by the first twig and to the right above is the distinct purple hue of a nitrogen gas Aurora display. I started photographing the Comet on the 24th and finished 17th April when I was able to include two Aurora displays. This photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP processed for a 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 28mm f2.8 lens wide open at around 20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Kincardine O’Neil, north, Comet, Hyakutake, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, Torphins, Arc, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, 1996, April, spring, landscape, photos, photographs, tail, green, bluish, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, nitrogen, purple, blue, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 35mm, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP, RSP-412, exposed, time, long, Nikon, FM2, 28mm
Aurora Deeside ab93113jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish winter January 1993 display faint rays cottage Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 31st January, 1993 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking mainly north over the cottage just to right of a gean tree which is aligned to magnetic North. The display started after 21.00hrsUT on the 31st January and developed into a low grade display continuing with mainly single rays until 01.00hrs UT. This photo was taken at 21.30hrs in the first surge of activity which started around 21.00hrsUT with a hint of faint rays. The photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP 11 rated at 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 24mm f2.8 lens wide open at around 20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, corona, crown, huge, scale, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, 1993, January, February, landscape, photos, photographs, experiment, green, filter, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, exposed, time, long, gean, trees, North, Pole, Star
Aurora Deeside ab93112jhp 
 Aurora Borealis winter January 1993 display start house chimney pot Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 31st January, 1993 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking mainly north over the cottage just to right of a gean tree which is aligned to magnetic North. The display started after 21.00hrsUT on the 31st January and developed into a low grade display continuing with mainly single rays until 01.00hrs UT. This photo was taken at 21.15hrs in the first surge of activity which started around 21.00hrsUT. The photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP 11 rated at 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 24mm f2.8 lens wide open at around 20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, corona, crown, huge, scale, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, 1993, January, February, landscape, photos, photographs, experiment, green, filter, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, exposed, time, long, gean, trees, North, Pole, Star
Low Grade Aurora bnm5755jhp 
 Aurora Borealis display Deeside Scotland autumn rays green Plough low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the fourth of four exposures when additonal rays were observed and then they disappeared. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 14 seconds at 23.29hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5754jhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland autumn 2016 faint mulitple rays green Plough low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the third of four exposures when additonal rays were observed. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 14 seconds at 23.28hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5753jhp 
 Northern Lights arc Scottish October 2016 faint rays low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the second of four exposures when additonal rays were observed. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 13 seconds at 23.24hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5752jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish autumn faint rays low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the first of four exposures when additonal rays were observed. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 12 seconds at 23.23hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5740jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland autumn very faint rays poor quality display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 26th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and although I did not see anything defined this one expsoure suggests a faint ray above the central tree. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f5.6 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 11 seconds at 23.27hrsUT which was slightly underexposed. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora The Neuk au7133ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Lights Deeside Aberdeenshire thin rays winter January 1990 on 23rd and first of the new decade taken on the Harestone Road to the west of Banchory at a small inset into a field by The Neuk farm. I cleared it with the farmer that I could park there and it gave me a clear view to the Hill of Fare to the North of Banchory. This photo is one of the first of 1990 which proved to be an extremely productive decade for Aurora displays and photography. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and exposed around the 20 seconds I later settled on. As there was moonlight then there is some additional overexposure element along with less saturation in the colours.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September.

The large dark feature to the bottom right is a hay bale. This second selection of three photos were taken after 23.00 as in this case with this arc starting a second period of activity which finished around 23.30UT and this was gthe last photo i took that evening. This location and the nearby layby at The Ley farm entrance with it’s beautiful tree, became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night were spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, January, 23rd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7132ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Crathes Aberdeenshire thin rays winter January 23rd 1990 taken on the Harestone Road to the west of Banchory at a small inset into a field by The Neuk farm. I cleared it with the farmer that I could park there and it gave me a clear view to the Hill of Fare to the North of Banchory. This photo is one of the first of 1990 which proved to be an extremely productive decade for Aurora displays and photography. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and exposed around the 20 seconds I later settled on. As there was moonlight then there is some additional overexposure element along with less saturation in the colours.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September.

The large dark feature to the bottom right is a hay bale. This second selection of three photos were taken after 23.00 as in this case with this arc starting a second period of activity which finished around 23.30UT. This location and the nearby layby at The Ley farm entrance with it’s beautiful tree, became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night were spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, January, 23rd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7129ajhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights display Neuk Crathes Deeside rays winter January 23rd 1990 taken on the Harestone Road to the west of Banchory at a small inset into a field by The Neuk farm. I cleared it with the farmer that I could park there and it gave me a clear view to the Hill of Fare to the North of Banchory. This photo is one of the first of 1990 which proved to be an extremely productive decade for Aurora displays and photography. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and exposed around the 20 seconds I later settled on. As there was moonlight then there is some additional overexposure element along with less saturation in the colours.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September.

The large dark feature to the bottom right is a hay bale. This second selection of three photos were taken after 23.00 as in this case with this arc starting a second period of activity which finished around 23.30UT. This location and the nearby layby at The Ley farm entrance with it’s beautiful tree, became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night were spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, January, 23rd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7124ajhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights display Neuk Crathes Deeside rays winter January 23rd 1990 taken on the Harestone Road to the west of Banchory at a small inset into a field by The Neuk farm. I cleared it with the farmer that I could park there and it gave me a clear view to the Hill of Fare to the North of Banchory. This photo is one of the first of 1990 which proved to be an extremely productive decade for Aurora displays and photography. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and exposed around the 20 seconds I later settled on. As there was moonlight then there is some additional overexposure element along with less saturation in the colours.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September.

The large dark feature to the bottom right is a hay bale. The first selection of photos was taken after 22.30 as in this case, the later ones after a second period of activity nearer 23.30UT. This location and the nearby layby at The Ley farm entrance with it’s beautiful tree, became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night were spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, January, 23rd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7117ajhp 
 Scottish January 1990 Aurora Borealis display Neuk Crathes Banchory ray winter 23rd taken on the Harestone Road to the west of Banchory at a small inset into a field by The Neuk farm. I cleared it with the farmer that I could park there and it gave me a clear view to the Hill of Fare to the North of Banchory. This photo is one of the first of 1990 which proved to be an extremely productive decade for Aurora displays and photography. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and exposed around the 20 seconds I later settled on. As there was moonlight then there is some additional overexposure element along with less saturation in the colours.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September.

The large dark feature to the bottom right is a hay bale. The first selection of photos was taken after 22.30 as in this case, the later ones after a second period of activity nearer 23.30UT. This location and the nearby layby at The Ley farm entrance with it’s beautiful tree, became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night were spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, January, 23rd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au718ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Neuk Crathes strong red rays Plough winter December 27th 1989 taken on the Harestone Road to the west of Banchory at a small inset into a field by The Neuk farm. I cleared it with the farmer that I could park there and it gave me a clear view to the Hill of Fare to the North of Banchory. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the fifth display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and exposed around the 20 seconds I later settled on. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark feature to the bottom right is a hay bale. I have no record of the time of this display but probably before mid-night and I only took 8 frames. This location and the nearby layby at The Ley farm entrance with it’s beautiful tree, became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au712ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Neuk Deeside Ursa Major stars Banchory rays red winter December 27th 1989 taken on the Harestone Road to the west of Banchory at a small inset into a field by The Neuk farm. I cleared it with the farmer that I could park there and it gave me a clear view to the Hill of Fare to the North of Banchory. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the fifth display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and exposed around the 20 seconds I later settled on. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark feature to the bottom right is a hay bale. I have no record of the time of this display but probably before mid-night and I only took 8 frames. This location and the nearby layby at The Ley farm entrance with it’s beautiful tree, became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au711ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis beginning arc rays Plough Ursa Major stars rays red winter December 27th 1989 taken on the Harestone Road to the west of Banchory at a small inset into a field by The Neuk farm. I cleared it with the farmer that I could park there and it gave me a clear view to the Hill of Fare to the North of Banchory. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the fifth display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and exposed around the 20 seconds I later settled on. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark feature to the bottom right is a hay bale. I have no record of the time of this display but probably before mid-night and I only took 8 frames. This location and the nearby layby at The Ley farm entrance with it’s beautiful tree, became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au61714jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Cairn O’Mount rays red winter clouds December 22nd 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the fourth display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed slightly shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road but it must have been a short lived event as I only took four exposures. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, 22nd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au61713jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Cairn O’Mount rays red winter December 22nd 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the fourth display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road but it must have been a short lived event as I only took four exposures. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, 22nd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61041jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis underexposed grainy rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an underexposed example while bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610415jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example with an exposure near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610410jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example and bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Eslie Greater au61355jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Deeside Eslie Stone Circle display Agfa film October 1989 taken from the Recumbent Stone Circle called Esslie the Greater at Eslie to the SE of Banchory overlooking Feughside and Scolty Hill. This photo is from my second Aurora display I photographed using Agfa 1000 RS 6.4.5cm format film stock using my Bronica ETRS, from memory the fastest 120 film available at the time. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

This photograph using Agfa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example was the one and only time I used it and I suspect it was underexposed as I would not have used my usual bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS a slower lens to my usual f2.8 35mm primes. Push processing the 35mm 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons and because of this I stopped using medium format stock almost straight away. This photo has no great technical merit as far as an Aurora record goes except as an example of the 645 format, Agfa film and appears to be the only record I had of this second observed display on the 21st October – I have a note that I missed a display on the 20th. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Eslie, Banchory, Feughside, Esslie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, Bronze, Age, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, October, medium, format, slide, transparency, film, Agfa, 1000 RS, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Eslie Greater au613514jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Esslie Stone Circle Greater Agfa 645 transparency October 1989 taken from the Recumbent Stone Circle called Esslie the Greater at Eslie to the SE of Banchory overlooking Feughside and Scolty Hill. This photo is from my second Aurora display I photographed using Agfa 1000 RS 6.4.5cm format film stock using my Bronica ETRS, from memory the fastest 120 film available at the time. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

This photograph using Agfa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example was the one and only time I used it and I suspect it was underexposed as I would not have used my usual bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS a slower lens to my usual f2.8 35mm primes. Push processing the 35mm 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons and because of this I stopped using medium format stock almost straight away. This photo has no great technical merit as far as an Aurora record goes except as an example of the 645 format, Agfa film and appears to be the only record I had of this second observed display on the 21st October – I have a note that I missed a display on the 20th. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Eslie, Banchory, Feughside, Esslie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, Bronze, Age, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, October, medium, format, slide, transparency, film, Agfa, 1000 RS, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au61709jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis lights Cairn O’Mount rays red yellow green winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au61708jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Cairn O’Mount rays red winter active 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au61706jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis quiet display Cairn O’Mount arc winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au61705jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Cairn O’Mount rays red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au61704jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights early stage display winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au61703jhp 
 Scottish low grade Aurora Borealis display Cairn O’Mount arc active winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617023jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis dying phase Northern sky faint rays yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617020jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis rays bundle colours ray purple yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au61701jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis arc north Cairn O’Mount winter December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT on the 11th December. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617018jhp 
 Scotrish Aurora Borealis northwards night sky bright multiple rays yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617017jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis Cairn O’Mount Ursa Major bright rays yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, Plough, constellation, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617016jhp 
 Scotland British Aurora Borealis Plough stars Cairn O’Mount rays yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617015jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis active phase Cairn O’Mount bright ray yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617013jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis active phase colourful bright rays yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617012jhp 
 Scottisah Northern Lights active phase Cairn O’Mount rays stars yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617011jhp 
 Scottish Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis colours active phase Cairn O’Mount bright ray yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61058jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display ray single Plough Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61054jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint multiple rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610536jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis rays red clouds moving shapes Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the end of my first film, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610535jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye strong rays red clouds patterns autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610533jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Northern Lights display rays red clouds stars autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610531jhp 
 Scotland photo Aurora Borealis display rays pink clouds windy shapes autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61052jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye overexposed rays trailing stars red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610527jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis night sky strong multiple rays red Arc autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610526jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Glen Dye many strong bright rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610525jhp 
 Scottish active Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays large red clouds autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610524jhp 
 Scotland Merry Dancers display rays red stars several Aurora autumn September 26th & 27th 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610523jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red long exposure clouds 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610521jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Clachnaben hill rays mulitple red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610520jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display rays red clouds Jim Henderson Photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the first film I tried out, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61051jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye rays clouds first photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo was the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible and some rays visible through the gaps. This was probably an underexposure, maybe 10 seconds or so. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610517jhp 
 Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint rays clouds gaps autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617120jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis maximum bright strong display winter hills Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617119jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Boxing Day December rays bright Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617118jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Boxing Day west rays Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, multiple, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617117jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis moving ray red headlights Boxing Day Aberdeenshire December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617115jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights multiple rays arc red yellow display 1989 Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617114jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis several rays moving arc hill starting display Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured