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Aurora over Scotland (346 files)

Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights displays photographed taken over Aberdeeshire in Scotland since 1989 covering some 350 events with arc, rays, coronas with a wide rnage of shapes and colours
Aurora First Digital auSM3912jhp 
 Aurora display Cassiopeia Scottish cloud moving rays winter green arc March 2003 Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 30th March 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.30.12hrsUT showing strong patches of green arc with some strong ray activity developing and was taken at the end of the second evening’s activity after I stopped using slide film around 23.40hrs UT. This photo was taken with a Fuji Finepix S2 digital camera, the first time I used a digital camera for Aurora photography and a major departure from the years of using 35mm slide film. It was set at an ISO of 1600 to match the same sensitivity used for slide film, push developing 400asa Fuji to 1600asa with exposures set around the 20 second mark and lens aperture of f2.8 and the quality results i.e. noise factor was better than a corresponding grain pattern with pushed slide film. This particular photo was exposed for 16 secs with a 19mm focal length. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2003, March, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, Fuji, Finepix, S2Pro, DSLR, digital, camera, earliest
Aurora First Digital auSM3903jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland cloud moving rays winter March 2003 Cassiopeia Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 30th March 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.24hrsUT showing strong patches of green arc and a hint of some ray activity developing and was taken at the end of the second evening’s activity after I stopped using slide film around 23.40hrs UT. This photo was taken with a Fuji Finepix S2 digital camera, the first time I used a digital camera for Aurora photography and a major departure from the years of using 35mm slide film. It was set at an ISO of 1600 to match the same sensitivity used for slide film, push developing 400asa Fuji to 1600asa with exposures set around the 20 second mark and lens aperture of f2.8 and the quality results i.e. noise factor was better than a corresponding grain pattern with pushed slide film. This particular photo was exposed for 11 secs with a 19mm focal length. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2003, March, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, Fuji, Finepix, S2Pro, DSLR, digital, camera, earliest
Aurora First Digital auSM3907jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland cloud moving red north winter March 2003 Cassiopeia Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 30th March 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.27hrsUT showing strong patches of green arc and a hint of some red ray activity developing over a tree top on a north bearing and was taken at the end of the second evening’s activity after I stopped using slide film around 23.40hrs UT. This photo was taken with a Fuji Finepix S2 digital camera, the first time I used a digital camera for Aurora photography and a major departure from the years of using 35mm slide film. It was set at an ISO of 1600 to match the same sensitivity used for slide film, push developing 400asa Fuji to 1600asa with exposures set around the 20 second mark and lens aperture of f2.8 and the quality results i.e. noise factor was better than a corresponding grain pattern with pushed slide film. This particular photo was exposed for 11 secs with a 19mm focal length. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2003, March, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, Fuji, Finepix, S2Pro, DSLR, digital, camera, earliest
Deeside Aurora bnm6451jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland spring Northern Lights waning display rays purple red Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 8 seconds at 21.47.18hrsUT and was my last exposure as it almost disappeared at this stage. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6448jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish spring Lights display rays purple red Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 12 seconds at 21.46.17hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, nitrogen, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6447jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland spring display multiple rays colourful Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 11 seconds at 21.45.53hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6446jhp 
 Aurora Borealis British March display rays colours shooting star Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Small meteor burn out visible about 1/3 in from left just in the faint purple band. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 12 seconds at 21.45.39hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Meteor, shooting star, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6445jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish spring display rays colours blue red pink Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 7.4 seconds at 21.45.30hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6444jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish March spring display rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 3200 for 6.9 seconds at 21.45.19hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6443jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland March spring display start Arc Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 3200 for 12 seconds at 21.44.13hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside ab93130jhp 
 Scottish winter February 1993 display Northern Lights arc Torphins lights green house chimney pot Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 1st February, 1993 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking mainly north over the cottage just to right of a gean tree which is aligned to magnetic North. The display started after 21.00hrsUT on the 31st January and developed into a low grade display continuing with mainly single rays until 01.00hrs UT. This photo was taken at 00.20hrs into a second surge of activity which started around 00.05hrsUTwith a moving ray showing the wide band from a long exposure. The photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP 11 rated at 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 24mm f2.8 lens wide open at around 20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, corona, crown, huge, scale, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, 1993, January, February, landscape, photos, photographs, experiment, green, filter, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, exposed, time, long, gean, trees, North, Pole, Star
Aurora Deeside ab93121jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish winter February 1993 display ray red Northern Lights house chimney pot Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 1st February, 1993 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking mainly north over the cottage just to right of a gean tree which is aligned to magnetic North. The display started after 21.00hrsUT on the 31st January and developed into a low grade display continuing with mainly single rays until 01.00hrs UT. This photo was taken at 00.12hrs into a second surge of activity which started around 00.05hrsUTwith a moving ray showing the wide band from a long exposure. The photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP 11 rated at 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 24mm f2.8 lens wide open at around 20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, corona, crown, huge, scale, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, 1993, January, February, landscape, photos, photographs, experiment, green, filter, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, exposed, time, long, gean, trees, North, Pole, Star, upright
Aurora Deeside ab93120jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter February 1993 display ray moving house chimney pot Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 1st February, 1993 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking mainly north over the cottage just to right of a gean tree which is aligned to magnetic North. The display started after 21.00hrsUT on the 31st January and developed into a low grade display continuing with mainly single rays until 01.00hrs UT. This photo was taken at 00.10hrs into a second surge of activity which started around 00.05hrsUTwith a moving ray showing the wide band from a long exposure. The photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP 11 rated at 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 24mm f2.8 lens wide open at around 20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, corona, crown, huge, scale, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, 1993, January, February, landscape, photos, photographs, experiment, green, filter, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, exposed, time, long, gean, trees, North, Pole, Star
Urban Aurora au74015jhp 
 Scotland Aurora display rays folding arc waning Deeside rooftops shed Aberdeenshire taken over Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au74014jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display rays folding arc horseshoe Cassiopeia clouds Deeside rooftops moonlight taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au74013ajhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Aurora rays folding arc horseshoe Cassiopeia rooftops moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au74012jhp 
 Scotland Deeside Aurora Borealis rays folding arc horseshoe rooftops moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7410jhp 
 Scotland Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis rays arc two houses bathroom lights funny folding arc horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7409jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis blue nitrogen two houses bathroom lights funny folding arc horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7408ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis blue nitrogen rays urban houses bathroom light folding arc horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7405ajhp 
 Scotland British Aurora Northern Lights blue nitrogen rays urban Banchory folding arc town houses horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7404jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display blue nitrogen rays small changes folding arc Banchory urban town houses horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7403jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis blue nitrogen rays folding arc Banchory urban town houses horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7402ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis rays folding arc Banchory urban town houses horseshoe blue nitrogen moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Low Grade Aurora bnm5755jhp 
 Aurora Borealis display Deeside Scotland autumn rays green Plough low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the fourth of four exposures when additonal rays were observed and then they disappeared. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 14 seconds at 23.29hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5754jhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland autumn 2016 faint mulitple rays green Plough low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the third of four exposures when additonal rays were observed. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 14 seconds at 23.28hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5753jhp 
 Northern Lights arc Scottish October 2016 faint rays low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the second of four exposures when additonal rays were observed. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 13 seconds at 23.24hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5752jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish autumn faint rays low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the first of four exposures when additonal rays were observed. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 12 seconds at 23.23hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5740jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland autumn very faint rays poor quality display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 26th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and although I did not see anything defined this one expsoure suggests a faint ray above the central tree. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f5.6 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 11 seconds at 23.27hrsUT which was slightly underexposed. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora The Neuk au816ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Rays red oxygen strong colours Christmas Day 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 24th December at 22.15 hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, December, 25th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au722816jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Neuk Arc Rays pink moonlight Plough October 1990 Aberdeenshire taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 29th October at 22.15 hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, pink, purple, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, October, 29th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au722815jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Neuk Arc Rays pink moonlight Plough autumn 1990 Aberdeenshire taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 29th October at 22.15 hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, pink, purple, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, October, 29th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au721126ajhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Neuk Rays red Plough Deeside autumn 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 9th Octoberr at 22.15 hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, Octoberr, 9th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au723636ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Northern Lights larch tree rays red Deeside November 1990 taken on the Harestone Road near the Banchory entrance. Taken on the 28 November at 00.33hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, winter, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, November, 28th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au723622jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights larch tree rays red stars Deeside winter 1990 taken on the Harestone Road near the Banchory entrance. Taken on the 28 November at 00.21hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, November, 28th, winter, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora & Larch au721133ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora display larch branches Rays red purple Deeside autumn 1990 taken on the Harestone Road near the Banchory end of the road by one of two large larch trees. Taken on the 9th Octoberr at 23.00 hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, October, 9th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au720434ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display weak Arc Ray Plough Banchory autumn 1990 taken on the Harestone Road. Taken on the 21st September at 02.41 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. This display was followed by a similar brighter display on the 14th of the month and in both displays the Plough Constellation was very prominent. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, September, 21st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au720433ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis weak Arc Ray red Plough Deeside autumn 1990 taken on the Harestone Road. Taken on the 21st September at 02.40 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. This display was followed by a similar brighter display on the 14th of the month and in both displays the Plough Constellation was very prominent. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, September, 21st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au720334ajhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights dying display red faint rays Plough Banchory 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 14th September at 01.25 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. This display was followed by a similar display on the 21st of the month. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, September, 14th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au720317ajhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Active Arc red oxygen rays Plough constellation 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 14th September at 01.07 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. This display was followed by a similar display on the 21st of the month. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, September, 14th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au720316ajhp 
 British Aurora Borealis Active Arc red oxygen rays Plough Crathes September 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 14th September at 01.06 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. This display was followed by a similar display on the 21st of the month. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, September, 14th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au720315ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Neuk Active Arc rays Plough Bid Dipper Deeside autumn 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 14th September at 01.05 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. This display was followed by a similar display on the 21st of the month. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, September, 14th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au720314ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Neuk Arc Plough Stars Ursa Major Deeside autumn 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 14th September at 01.00 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. A fairly typical arc and active rays display showing the red of high level oxygen I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left seen in several of these photos. This display was followed by a similar display on the 21st of the month. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, September, 14th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7756jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis arc morning nitrogen purple rays May telephone poles 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.48hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7753jhp 
 Scotland Aurora new Borealis display arc morning nitrogen purple rays May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.47hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77526jhp 
 British Aurora lights display Crathes Goddess dawn bright folding arc rays morning 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 03.15.30hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77525jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Banchory Goddess dawn bright folding arc summer morning 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 03.15hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77524jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Deeside Goddess dawn light folding arc summer morning 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 03.10hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77521jhp 
 Dawn approach active lights display arc red purple nitrogen rays Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.56hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77520jhp 
 Dawn approaching Aurora lights display red purple nitrogen rays Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.57hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77519jhp 
 Aurora Borealis British active display arc red purple nitrogen rays poles Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.55hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77518jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Deeside folded arc purple nitrogen rays poles Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.53hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77516jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Deeside arc purple rays Ley poles silhouette Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.53hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77515jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Deeside Banchory new arc purple large ray tree silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.52hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77514jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Aberdeenshire new arc purple red rays tree silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.51.30hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77513jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights very active purple red rays tree siluoette May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.51hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77511jhp 
 British Northern Lights arc active purple red rays tree stars Banchory 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.50hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77510jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis arc active nitrogen purple red rays tree silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.49hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7649ajhp 
 British Northern Lights moon large red pink oxygen rays Aberdeenshire 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.09hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7645ajhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Harestone Road large red rays Aberdeenshire 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.06hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76432ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis red oxygen rays larch branches silhouette Deeside display 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.26hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76431ajhp 
 British Aurora Borealis rays larch branches silhouette Scottish display 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.25hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7642ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Harestone Road moon red rays Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.05hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76427ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis moving blurred red pink rays Banchory Deeside 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.23hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76426ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis strong display red pink rays Jim Henderson Photo 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.22hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76425ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis increasing display red pink rays spring summer 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.21hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76413ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis moon setting patches faint rays Deeside May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.13hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76412ajhp 
 Aurora Borealis British rich pink rays beautiful larch tree branches silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking and although I had seen some reddish hue was not expecting to see this vibrant pink. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.11.30hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76411ajhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland large pink highup rays Deeside larch tree 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking and although I had seen some reddish hue was not expecting to see this vibrant pink. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.11hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76410ajhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights large pink candy floss rays Deeside larch tree 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking and although I had seen some reddish hue was not expecting to see this vibrant pink. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.10hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76335jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Tree folding curving arc rays bright colours display 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.49hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76334jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Tree folding arc rays strong active display Banchory 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.47hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76331jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Ley Tree folding arc strong active display Deeside 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.45hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76323jhp 
 Scottish Aurora tree active rays red yellow silhouette Jim Henderson photo 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.41hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76322jhp 
 British Northern Lights tree arc rays pink yellow spring silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.40hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76319jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis moon arc rays yellow spring telephone pole silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.38hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76318jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis folding arc rays yellow Aberdeenshire spring telephone pole 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.37hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76313jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Ley Tree Deeside arc rays red pink spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.31hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora with Moon au76227jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis Ley moonlight moon Aberdeenside May spring morning 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. This is an excellent example that Aurora displays can be seen durting moonlight conditions. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.10 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au76224ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Neuk hayrake Cassiopeia moonlight Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 27th April at 23.15hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. This evening was followed a day later by a very active morning on the 1st May which started after midnight and lasted until after dawn. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7624ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Ley tree faint red rays Deeside Banchory spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 27th April at 22.50hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. This evening was followed a day later by a very active morning on the 1st May which started after midnight and lasted until after dawn. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76236ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis telephone pole active rays stage display lights spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.20hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76228ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis telephone pole early stage display Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.11hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83636jhp 
 British spring Aurora Corona Crathes Castle zenith crown overhead shape pastel colours turrets located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 25th March 1991 at 00.10hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 25th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83635jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Corona Crathes Castle ghost ghostlike shape pastel colours turrets located at this National Trust for Scotland property at Crathes near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 25th March 1991 at 00.05hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 25th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83634jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights midnight Corona Castle sheets pastel colours turrets located at this National Trust for Scotland property at Crathes near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 25th March 1991 at 00.00hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 25th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83631jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Corona Castle sheets pastel colours Jim Henderson photo located at this National Trust for Scotland property at Crathes near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 24th March 1991 at 23.59hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 24th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83629jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Corona Castle sheets light pastel pink green colours located at this National Trust for Scotland property at Crathes near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 24th March 1991 at 23.47hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 24th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83628jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis Corona Castle arms wings rays pastel pink green colours located at this National Trust for Scotland property at Crathes near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 24th March 1991 at 23.46hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 24th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83627jhp 
 Northern Lights Scottish Corona Crathes Castle arms scale cascade pastel located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 24th March 1991 at 23.45hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 24th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83624jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Corona Crathes Castle turret Deeside rays pastel located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 24th March 1991 at 23.40hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 24th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83620jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Corona zenith centre Crathes Castle spring pastel colours overhead this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 24th March 1991 at 23.32hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 24th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au83619jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Corona zenith Crathes Castle Deeside spring pastel colours located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 24th March 1991 at 23.30hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. The photos taken in this March sequence shows the huge scale of a Corona zenith completely overhead with a pastel mix of green and red rays from high level oxygen falling from directly overhead and dropping to the apparent ground level set against the useful scale of the castle. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Corona, zenith, arms, wings, overhead, huge, celestial, scale, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, red, green, yellow, pink, pastel, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, light, pollution, celestial, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1991, spring, winter, March, 24th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 24mm, f2.8, Sigma, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au721136ajhp 
 Scottish autumn Northern Lights Crathes Castle Plough red glow faint beams 1990 located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 9th October at 23.49 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. This one was a short period of a strong red glow of high level oxygen and some beams were discernaible on the slides. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, autumn, October, 9th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au721135ajhp 
 British Northern Lights Crathes Castle Deeside oxygen red glow faint beams 1990 located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 9th October at 23.48 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, autumn, October, 9th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au721134jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis Crathes Castle golden cock autumn oxygen red weathervane reflection moonlight located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 9th October at 23.46 hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, autumn, October, 9th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au721134ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Crathes Castle strong glow rays October oxygen red 1990 located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 9th October at 23.47hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, autumn, October, 9th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au721133ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Crathes Castle Deeside oxygen gas strong red Plough located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 9th October at 23.50 hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, autumn, October, 9th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au721132ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Crathes Castle Deeside autumn oxygen red 1990 located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 9th October at 23.45 hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, autumn, October, 9th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au718331jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Neuk haystack clouds light pollution summer nitrogen purple 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 20th August at 02.11 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pollution, orange, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, summer, August, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au718326jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Deeside summer nitrogen purple rays clouds 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 20th August at 02.07 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, summer, August, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au718323jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Neuk Deeside summer nitrogen purple rays clouds stars 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 20th August at 02.04 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, summer, August, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au718321jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis Neuk haystack clouds lights summer nitrogen purple rays 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 20th August at 02.01 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, summer, August, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au71838jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Crathes Castle grounds Deeside summer nitrogen purple rays stars 1990 located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 20th August at 01.05 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, NTS, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, summer, August, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au71835jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Crathes Castle nitrogen purple silhouette rays August display 1990 located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 20th August at 01.00hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, summer, August, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au71834jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis Crathes Castle nitrogen purple early rays August display 1990 located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 20th August at 00.58 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, summer, August, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Crathes Castle au718313jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Crathes Castle summer nitrogen purple waning faint 1990 located at this National Trust for Scotland property near Banchory, west of Aberdeen. Taken on the 20th August at 01.15hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops however this particular film was Fuji P1600 which for a short time was their fastest slide film. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In these photos there is the purple of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and probably also a function of the lighter light levels given these were taken in August. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Castle, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, silhouette, clouds, light, pollution, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, summer, August, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, P1600, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Corona ab0055jhp 
 Aurora Corona Red Oxygen Zenith explosion rays Spring Aberdeenshire Scotland taken at 23.25 hours UT on the 6th April, 2000 over Deeside some 25 miles west of Aberdeen. This event is the most major scale of display visible for as the display starts to develop and increase in power it passes southwards creating a moving zenith overhead giving the impression of looking underneath a huge crown often with multiple colours. The shape at the zenith from which rays drop to all the horizons in a 360 degree sweep can create weird shapes which are changing rapidly around the central vortex. This level of display is rare in the UK because the power levels need to be huge and are caused mainly by a CME, Coronal Mass Ejection from the Sun’s surface with the eruption aimed directly at the Earth. It is unusual for the more common Solar Wind generated displays to reach the UK let along push as far south as the Channel although sometimes they can be combined with a direct CME hit and cause large and colourful events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Ord Fundlie, Crooktree, cottage, electric, power, lines, Torphins, Kincardine, O’Neil, April, spring, Aurora Borealis, Corona, zenith, crown, Arc, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, format, photo, photos, photographs, slide, scanned, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Orion, Pleiades, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, film, scan, 35mm, Fuji, 400asa, rated, 1600asa, Nikon, FM2, Sigma, 15mm, lens, ultra-wide, fisheye, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release
Aurora Corona ab00512jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Corona green red wings shape sweeping Scottish British UK Deeside eastwards Aberdeenshire taken at 00.35 hours UT on the 7th April, 2000 over Deeside some 25 miles west of Aberdeen. This event is the most major scale of display visible for as the display starts to develop and increase in power it passes southwards creating a moving zenith overhead giving the impression of looking underneath a huge crown often with multiple colours. The shape at the zenith from which rays drop to all the horizons in a 360 degree sweep can create weird shapes which are changing rapidly around the central vortex. This level of display is rare in the UK because the power levels need to be huge and are caused mainly by a CME, Coronal Mass Ejection from the Sun’s surface with the eruption aimed directly at the Earth. It is unusual for the more common Solar Wind generated displays to reach the UK let along push as far south as the Channel although sometimes they can be combined with a direct CME hit and cause large and colourful events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Ord Fundlie, Crooktree, cottage, electric, power, lines, Torphins, Kincardine, O’Neil, April, spring, Aurora Borealis, Corona, zenith, crown, Arc, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, portrait, format, photo, photos, photographs, slide, scanned, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Orion, Pleiades, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, film, scan, 35mm, Fuji, 400asa, rated, 1600asa, Nikon, FM2, Sigma, 15mm, lens, ultra-wide, fisheye, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release
Aurora Corona ab00418jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Corona Rays Plough Oxygen Gas British eastwards Aberdeenshire taken at 22.47 hoursm UT on the 6th April, 2000 over Deeside some 25 miles west of Aberdeen. This event is the most major scale of display visible for as the display starts to develop and increase in power it passes southwards creating a moving zenith overhead giving the impression of looking underneath a huge crown often with multiple colours. The shape at the zenith from which rays drop to all the horizons in a 360 degree sweep can create weird shapes which are changing rapidly around the central vortex. This level of display is rare in the UK because the power levels need to be huge and are caused mainly by a CME, Coronal Mass Ejection from the Sun’s surface with the eruption aimed directly at the Earth. It is unusual for the more common Solar Wind generated displays to reach the UK let along push as far south as the Channel although sometimes they can be combined with a direct CME hit and cause large and colourful events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Ord Fundlie, Crooktree, cottage, electric, power, lines, Torphins, Kincardine, O’Neil, April, spring, Aurora Borealis, Corona, zenith, crown, Arc, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, portrait, format, photo, photos, photographs, slide, scanned, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Orion, Pleiades, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, film, scan, 35mm, Fuji, 400asa, rated, 1600asa, Nikon, FM2, Sigma, 15mm, lens, ultra-wide, fisheye, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release
Aurora Corona ab00414jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Corona zenith shape eerie abstract Oxygen Gas Scottish Deeside eastwards Aberdeenshire taken at 23.49 hours UT on the 6th April, 2000 over Deeside some 25 miles west of Aberdeen. This event is the most major scale of display visible for as the display starts to develop and increase in power it passes southwards creating a moving zenith overhead giving the impression of looking underneath a huge crown often with multiple colours. The shape at the zenith from which rays drop to all the horizons in a 360 degree sweep can create weird shapes which are changing rapidly around the central vortex. This level of display is rare in the UK because the power levels need to be huge and are caused mainly by a CME, Coronal Mass Ejection from the Sun’s surface with the eruption aimed directly at the Earth. It is unusual for the more common Solar Wind generated displays to reach the UK let along push as far south as the Channel although sometimes they can be combined with a direct CME hit and cause large and colourful events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Ord Fundlie, Crooktree, cottage, electric, power, lines, Torphins, Kincardine, O’Neil, April, spring, Aurora Borealis, Corona, zenith, crown, Arc, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, format, photo, photos, photographs, slide, scanned, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Orion, Pleiades, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, film, scan, 35mm, Fuji, 400asa, rated, 1600asa, Nikon, FM2, Sigma, 15mm, lens, ultra-wide, fisheye, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release
Aurora Corona ab00413jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Corona zenith shape changing wings abstract Scotland UK Deeside eastwards Aberdeenshire taken at 23.48 hours UT on the 6th April, 2000 over Deeside some 25 miles west of Aberdeen. This event is the most major scale of display visible for as the display starts to develop and increase in power it passes southwards creating a moving zenith overhead giving the impression of looking underneath a huge crown often with multiple colours. The shape at the zenith from which rays drop to all the horizons in a 360 degree sweep can create weird shapes which are changing rapidly around the central vortex. This level of display is rare in the UK because the power levels need to be huge and are caused mainly by a CME, Coronal Mass Ejection from the Sun’s surface with the eruption aimed directly at the Earth. It is unusual for the more common Solar Wind generated displays to reach the UK let along push as far south as the Channel although sometimes they can be combined with a direct CME hit and cause large and colourful events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Ord Fundlie, Crooktree, cottage, electric, power, lines, Torphins, Kincardine, O’Neil, April, spring, Aurora Borealis, Corona, zenith, crown, Arc, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, format, photo, photos, photographs, slide, scanned, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Orion, Pleiades, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, film, scan, 35mm, Fuji, 400asa, rated, 1600asa, Nikon, FM2, Sigma, 15mm, lens, ultra-wide, fisheye, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release
Aurora Corona ab0028jhp 
 Aurora Corona Red Green Oxygen Zenith flower Spring Aberdeenshire Scottish taken at 20.10 hours UT on the 6th April, 2000 over Deeside some 25 miles west of Aberdeen. This event is the most major scale of display visible for as the display starts to develop and increase in power it passes southwards creating a moving zenith overhead giving the impression of looking underneath a huge crown often with multiple colours. The shape at the zenith from which rays drop to all the horizons in a 360 degree sweep can create weird shapes which are changing rapidly around the central vortex. This level of display is rare in the UK because the power levels need to be huge and are caused mainly by a CME, Coronal Mass Ejection from the Sun’s surface with the eruption aimed directly at the Earth. It is unusual for the more common Solar Wind generated displays to reach the UK let along push as far south as the Channel although sometimes they can be combined with a direct CME hit and cause large and colourful events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Ord Fundlie, Crooktree, cottage, electric, power, lines, Torphins, Kincardine, O’Neil, April, spring, Aurora Borealis, Corona, zenith, crown, Arc, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, format, photo, photos, photographs, slide, scanned, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Orion, Pleiades, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, film, scan, 35mm, Fuji, 400asa, rated, 1600asa, Nikon, FM2, Sigma, 15mm, lens, ultra-wide, fisheye, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release
Aurora The Neuk au7517ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Cassiopeia Deeside red purple rays stars spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 00.37 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7516ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Crathes hayrake Deeside red rays stars spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 00.35 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75136ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis high rays purple nitrogen gas April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.45hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75136Ejhp 
 Scotland Deeside Aurora Borealis rays purple nitrogen red oxygen gas April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken near the end of the display on the 18th April around 01.55hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75135ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora hayrake rays Aberdeenshire Jim Henderson photo spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.40hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75134ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Cassiopeia hayrake wheel silhouette rays Aberdeenshire spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.38hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75133ajhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights hayrake wheel silhouette stars several rays Aberdeenshire spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.37 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75131ajhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Cassiopeia stars several rays Aberdeenshire spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.36 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the psace of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75128ajhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Banchory Cassiopeia red purple nitrogen Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.36 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the psace of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75127ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Crathes Cassiopeia red purple nitrogen Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.35 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the psace of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75119ajhp 
 British Aurora Borealis clouds red purple colours rays April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.25 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75116ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Northern Lights clouds red purple rays strong arc April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.17 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75114ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora new display clouds Deeside red purple rays arc April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.12 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au71129ajhp 
 British Aurora Borealis February winter rays red Deeside west Hill Fare 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 16th February, this one around 01.15hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 16th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au71128ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis eastwards February winter red large rays active 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 16th February, this one around 01.05hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 16th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au71125ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Neuk February winter rays streaming active movement 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 16th February, this one around 00.59hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 16th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7514ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora lights red strong rays Cassiopeia pink yellow Deeside April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 00.03hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7513ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis red strong rays Cassiopeia stars Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 00.01hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In this case there was full moonlight behind me so hence the very obvious record of the landscape and the hayrake. It also gives a colour hue although some of the red is still visible. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75120ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis arc red strong rays Cassiopeia stars north April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.29hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7393jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Neuk hayrake Cassiopeia moonlight Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 10th April at 22.25hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In this case there was full moonlight behind me so hence the very obvious record of the landscape and the hayrake. It also gives a colour hue although some of the red is still visible. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 10th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au73918ajhp 
 Deeside Scotland Aurora Hill Fare rays pink fields Cassiopeia moonlight April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 10th April at 23.00hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In this case there was full moonlight behind me so hence the very obvious record of the landscape and the hayrake. It also gives a colour hue although some of the red is still visible. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, farmland, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 10th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au73914ajhp 
 Deeside Scotland Northern Lights rays pink hayrake Cassiopeia dyke moonlight spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 10th April at 22.37hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In this case there was full moonlight behind me so hence the very obvious record of the landscape and the hayrake. It also gives a colour hue although some of the red is still visible. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 10th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au73913ajhp 
 Aberdeenshire Northern Lights rays pink hayrake Cassiopeia stars moonlight spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 10th April at 22.35hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In this case there was full moonlight behind me so hence the very obvious record of the landscape and the hayrake. It also gives a colour hue although some of the red is still visible. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 10th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au73912ajhp 
 British Aurora display rays red hayrake Cassiopeia stars moonlight spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 10th April at 22.32hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In this case there was full moonlight behind me so hence the very obvious record of the landscape and the hayrake. It also gives a colour hue although some of the red is still visible. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 10th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au73911ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora display rays red hayrake Cassiopeia moonlight Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 10th April at 22.30hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In this case there was full moonlight behind me so hence the very obvious record of the landscape and the hayrake. It also gives a colour hue although some of the red is still visible. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 10th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au72926ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Neuk hayrake Cassiopeia stars Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 27th March at 23.55hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 21st, 22nd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au72830Ejhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Neuk March spring ray cloud hayrake dramatic 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 26nd March, this one at 01.45hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, clouds, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 26th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au72630hp 
 Deeside Scotland Aurora Borealis red rays green yellow purple March 1990 spring taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 22nd March, this one at 01.12hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs and the ray is thus thicker than it is in reality as it is moving from right to left along the base arc and the bright patch at the base is the start of some streaming activity. Also note the faint mauve colour on the extreme right evidence of nitrogen gas as well as the standard oxygen colours of red and green. I found this exposure time as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 21st, 22nd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au72629jhp 
 Scotland deeside Aurora Borealis Neuk March spring rays many strong colors 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 22nd March, this one at 01.11hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 21st, 22nd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au72628hp 
 Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis Cassiopeia red rays green yellow March 1990 spring taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 22nd March, this one at 01.10hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs and the ray is thus thicker than it is in reality as it is moving from right to left along the base arc and thre bright patch at the base is the start of some streaming activity. I found this exposure time as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, Cassiopeia, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 21st, 22nd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au72627jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis Deeside rays moving streaming moving movement 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 22nd March, this one at 01.01hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs and the ray is thus thicker than it is in reality as it is moving from right to left along the base arc and thre bright patch at the base is the start of some streaming activity. I found this exposure time as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 21st, 22nd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au72626jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Neuk spring rays moving streaming activity movement 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 22nd March, this one at 01.hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs and the ray is thus thicker than it is in reality as it is moving from right to left along the base arc and thre bright patch at the base is the start of some streaming activity. I found this exposure time as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 21st, 22nd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au72625jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Neuk March strong ray moving streaming active movement 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken after midnight on the 22nd March, this one at 00.59hrs UT is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs and the ray is thus thicker than it is in reality as it is moving from right to left along the base arc. I found this exposure time as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left and also when streaming or flaring occurs with very bright patches starting at the base of the ray and moving rapidly upwards. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, movement, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 21st, 22nd, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au765ajhp 
 Scotland Deeside Aurora Borealis active moving ray red winter January 1990 taken on the Harestone Road to the west of Banchory at a small inset into a field by The Neuk farm. I cleared it with the farmer that I could park there and it gave me a clear view to the Hill of Fare to the North of Banchory. Other photos were taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and a tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo taken on the 25th of January around 01.30hrsUT and is one from early 1990, four nights before the end of the month, displays which proved to be an extremely productive decade for Aurora displays and photography. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 800asa and exposed around the 20 seconds I later settled on. The movement of the ray along the Arc from right to left is captured as a very broad band becuase of the time exposure. The rays are usually thin about an 1/8th of this band width but move very quickly. red is from the oxygen in the upper atmosphere.

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, farm, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, January, 24th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61041jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis underexposed grainy rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an underexposed example while bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610415jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example with an exposure near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610410jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example and bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61058jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display ray single Plough Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61054jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint multiple rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610536jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis rays red clouds moving shapes Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the end of my first film, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610535jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye strong rays red clouds patterns autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610533jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Northern Lights display rays red clouds stars autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610531jhp 
 Scotland photo Aurora Borealis display rays pink clouds windy shapes autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61052jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye overexposed rays trailing stars red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610527jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis night sky strong multiple rays red Arc autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610526jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Glen Dye many strong bright rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610525jhp 
 Scottish active Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays large red clouds autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610524jhp 
 Scotland Merry Dancers display rays red stars several Aurora autumn September 26th & 27th 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610523jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red long exposure clouds 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610521jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Clachnaben hill rays mulitple red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610520jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display rays red clouds Jim Henderson Photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the first film I tried out, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61051jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye rays clouds first photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo was the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible and some rays visible through the gaps. This was probably an underexposure, maybe 10 seconds or so. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610517jhp 
 Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint rays clouds gaps autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617120jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis maximum bright strong display winter hills Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617119jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Boxing Day December rays bright Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617118jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Boxing Day west rays Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, multiple, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617117jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis moving ray red headlights Boxing Day Aberdeenshire December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617115jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights multiple rays arc red yellow display 1989 Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617114jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis several rays moving arc hill starting display Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617113jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis early stage arc active Cairn O'Mount rays display Boxing Day December 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617111jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis arc start display Aberdeenshire Jim Henderson Photograph Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61065jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Clachnaben hill torr Glen Dye autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, upright, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610615jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Glen Dye red purple gas September 1989 slide film taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610613jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis red display Glen Dye earliest first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610612jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Plough stars Glen Dye Aberdeenshire first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610611jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Ursa Major red rays display Glen Dye earliest first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Deeside bnm1931jhp 
 Merry Dancers Scottish display March green rays stars westerly view Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.42.29UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1954jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland bright strong green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.51.42UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, bright, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1951jhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland bright red green rays Aberdeenshire March Deeside taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.50.59UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1942jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland multiple rays streaming Deeside Aberdeenshire display west taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.47.59UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, streaming, flaring, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1939jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish many flaming rays Jim Henderson Photo experiment taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.47.37UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, flaming, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1937jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green arc red rays Cassiopeia trees Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.44.50UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, Cassiopeia, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1934jhp 
 Norther Lights westwards Scottish photograph spring green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.43.51UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1922jhp 
 Aurora Lights display Scotland bright flaming yellow rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.39.00UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, 50mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1918jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish hotspot streaming green arc active rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.36.52UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, westwards, flaming, patching, streaming, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, 50mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1917jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish spring green bright strong rays Aberdeenshire trees silhouette taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.36.04UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, westerwards, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1912jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland March westerly trees dyke green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this photo at 21.33.37UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, upright, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1909jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish display west early spring green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.32.19UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1908jhp 
 Merry Dancers Northern Scotland green red rays easterly Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm this one at 21.32.00UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, north, eastwards, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1906jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland westwards green rays red display Cassiopeia Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.31.25UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, Cassiopeia, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph