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Searching all stock for "rhp":

Aurora over Scotland (117 files)

Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights displays photographed taken over Aberdeeshire in Scotland since 1989 covering some 350 events with arc, rays, coronas with a wide rnage of shapes and colours
Deeside Aurora au03436Ejhp 
 Northern Lights Aurora British summer 2003 nitrogen purple rays Plough Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the morning of the 27th July, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.40hrs UT showing strong multiple ray activity and the constellation Ursa Major, The Plough or Big Dipper clearly to left split by rays. I took 22 frames in 15 mins, including some Digital Fuji S2 images at maximum ISO of 1600 and the display ended around 00.40hrs BST ending the film. This photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RHP 11 400ASA film stock processed for a 1600asa rating using a Nikon FG20, 28mm f2.8 lens wide open with many exposures manually between 10 & 20 seconds because of the summer light levels. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, summer, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, 2003, July, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 35mm, slide, scanned, Fuji, RHP11, exposed, time, long, Nikon, FG20, DSLR, Fuji S2, digital
Deeside Aurora au03416jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Plough summer July 2003 purple nitrogen rays Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the morning of the 27th July, 2003 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.10hrBST showing strong multiple ray activity and the constellation Ursa Major, The Plough or Big Dipper clearly between two left hand rays. I took 22 frames in 15 mins, including some Digital Fuji S2 images at maximum ISO of 1600 and the display ended around 00.40hrs BST. This photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RHP 11 400ASA film stock processed for a 1600asa rating using a Nikon FG20, 28mm f2.8 lens wide open with many exposures manually between 10 & 20 seconds because of the summer light levels. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, summer, Torphins, Arc, rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, 2003, July, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, purple, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 35mm, slide, scanned, Fuji, RHP11, exposed, time, long, Nikon, FG20, DSLR, Fuji S2, digital
Deeside Aurora au0210jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Cassiopeia rays winter February 2002 Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the morning of the 6th February, 2002 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 00.42hrsUT showing strong patches with ray activity and the constellation Cassiopeia clearly visible top lefthand area, with activity stopping soon after this photo, the display having started with a low grade arc around midnight. This photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RHP11 400asa film processed for a 1600asa rating using a Nikon FG20, 28mm f2.8 lens wide open with many exposures manually around 20 seconds because of the lower light levels. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, winter, Torphins, Arc, pulsing, patches, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, 2002, February, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 35mm, slide, scanned, Fuji, RHP 11, 400asa, exposed, time, long, Nikon, FG20
Urban Aurora au74015jhp 
 Scotland Aurora display rays folding arc waning Deeside rooftops shed Aberdeenshire taken over Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au74014jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display rays folding arc horseshoe Cassiopeia clouds Deeside rooftops moonlight taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au74013ajhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Aurora rays folding arc horseshoe Cassiopeia rooftops moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au74012jhp 
 Scotland Deeside Aurora Borealis rays folding arc horseshoe rooftops moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7410jhp 
 Scotland Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis rays arc two houses bathroom lights funny folding arc horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7409jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis blue nitrogen two houses bathroom lights funny folding arc horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7408ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis blue nitrogen rays urban houses bathroom light folding arc horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7405ajhp 
 Scotland British Aurora Northern Lights blue nitrogen rays urban Banchory folding arc town houses horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7404jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display blue nitrogen rays small changes folding arc Banchory urban town houses horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7403jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis blue nitrogen rays folding arc Banchory urban town houses horseshoe moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Urban Aurora au7402ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis rays folding arc Banchory urban town houses horseshoe blue nitrogen moonlight Deeside taken in Banchory itself and was active between 1.30 and 2am on the 11th April, 1990. This display was an hour or so after an earlier display which I photographed at The Neuk between 10.40 and 11.30pm on the 10th. This display developed from pulsating patches of light which I noticed from my house on Station Road next to the East Church Manse around 1 to 1.15am BST and which developed into a full blown arc with very strong rays. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left but here creates the curtain like effect with the arc folding to create a horseshoe shape. In the photos the blue colour is of lower level nitrogen gas excitation and with a hint of purple towards the end of the display as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. Some of the colour is muted as there was a full moon, the light of which is evident in the brightness of the houses as well as the colour from tungsten lamps from street lights. Of humorous interest is the appearance on bathroom lights while I was photographing in two adjacent houses and neither of the occupants knew a display was underway when I enquired afterwards.
I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, town, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, pulsating, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, blue, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, moonlight, tungsten, houses, sheds, urban, street, bathroom, lights, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 1990, April, 11th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7756jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis arc morning nitrogen purple rays May telephone poles 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.48hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7753jhp 
 Scotland Aurora new Borealis display arc morning nitrogen purple rays May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.47hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77526jhp 
 British Aurora lights display Crathes Goddess dawn bright folding arc rays morning 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 03.15.30hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77525jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Banchory Goddess dawn bright folding arc summer morning 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 03.15hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77524jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Deeside Goddess dawn light folding arc summer morning 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 03.10hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77521jhp 
 Dawn approach active lights display arc red purple nitrogen rays Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.56hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77520jhp 
 Dawn approaching Aurora lights display red purple nitrogen rays Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.57hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77519jhp 
 Aurora Borealis British active display arc red purple nitrogen rays poles Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.55hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77518jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Deeside folded arc purple nitrogen rays poles Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.53hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77516jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Deeside arc purple rays Ley poles silhouette Scotland May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.53hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77515jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Deeside Banchory new arc purple large ray tree silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.52hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77514jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Aberdeenshire new arc purple red rays tree silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.51.30hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77513jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights very active purple red rays tree siluoette May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.51hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77511jhp 
 British Northern Lights arc active purple red rays tree stars Banchory 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.50hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au77510jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis arc active nitrogen purple red rays tree silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.49hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 775 was on my return around 02.40hrs at the Ley Tree using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these later stage photos around half midnight a further very powerful arc developed requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as an occasional focus point. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display giving the very pink hue as against red oxygen or purple nitrogen gas colours. It was also rather beautiful to see this happening as the increasing dawn light overwhelmed the Aurora display as Aurora was after all the Goddess of the Dawn. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, Goddess, dawn, early, morning, sunrise, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7649ajhp 
 British Northern Lights moon large red pink oxygen rays Aberdeenshire 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.09hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7645ajhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Harestone Road large red rays Aberdeenshire 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.06hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76432ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis red oxygen rays larch branches silhouette Deeside display 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.26hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76431ajhp 
 British Aurora Borealis rays larch branches silhouette Scottish display 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.25hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7642ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Harestone Road moon red rays Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.05hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76427ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis moving blurred red pink rays Banchory Deeside 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.23hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76426ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis strong display red pink rays Jim Henderson Photo 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.22hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76425ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis increasing display red pink rays spring summer 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.21hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76413ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis moon setting patches faint rays Deeside May 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.13hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76412ajhp 
 Aurora Borealis British rich pink rays beautiful larch tree branches silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking and although I had seen some reddish hue was not expecting to see this vibrant pink. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.11.30hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76411ajhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland large pink highup rays Deeside larch tree 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking and although I had seen some reddish hue was not expecting to see this vibrant pink. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.11hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76410ajhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights large pink candy floss rays Deeside larch tree 1990 taken on the Harestone Road before The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking and although I had seen some reddish hue was not expecting to see this vibrant pink. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 02.10hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 30 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated and this sequence, 764 was on my return around 02.00hrs on the Harestone Road near Banchory using Fuji RSP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa as against RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76335jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Tree folding curving arc rays bright colours display 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.49hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76334jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Tree folding arc rays strong active display Banchory 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.47hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76331jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Ley Tree folding arc strong active display Deeside 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.45hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76323jhp 
 Scottish Aurora tree active rays red yellow silhouette Jim Henderson photo 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.41hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76322jhp 
 British Northern Lights tree arc rays pink yellow spring silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.40hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76319jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis moon arc rays yellow spring telephone pole silhouette 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.38hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76318jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis folding arc rays yellow Aberdeenshire spring telephone pole 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.37hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76313jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Ley Tree Deeside arc rays red pink spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.31hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In these early stage photos around half midnight a very powerful arc developed and started folding with rays breaking upwards and also downwards, requiring moving between the right of the Ley tree and just to the left of it with the telephone pole as focus. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora with Moon au76227jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis Ley moonlight moon Aberdeenside May spring morning 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. This is an excellent example that Aurora displays can be seen durting moonlight conditions. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.10 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au76224ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Neuk hayrake Cassiopeia moonlight Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 27th April at 23.15hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. This evening was followed a day later by a very active morning on the 1st May which started after midnight and lasted until after dawn. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7624ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Ley tree faint red rays Deeside Banchory spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 27th April at 22.50hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. This evening was followed a day later by a very active morning on the 1st May which started after midnight and lasted until after dawn. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76236ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis telephone pole active rays stage display lights spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.20hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au76228ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis telephone pole early stage display Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road mostly by The Ley farm entrance tree where there was a useful lorry pull in on a sharp corner so made for safe parking. Taken on the early morning of the 1st May at 00.11hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and or RHP 400asa film developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were generally exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens, at maximum aperture, so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. In the latter stages of this display the increasing dawn light around 3.00am started to overwhelm the Aurora display. During the photographing of this display I ran out of film, 3 rolls, so had to return home for fresh stocks-a gap of about 20 mins when I am sure I missed some stunning moments; a mistake not to be repeated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Folding, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moon, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, larch, tree, branches, telephone, pole, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, May, 1st, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7517ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Cassiopeia Deeside red purple rays stars spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 00.37 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au7516ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Crathes hayrake Deeside red rays stars spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 00.35 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75136ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis high rays purple nitrogen gas April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.45hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75136Ejhp 
 Scotland Deeside Aurora Borealis rays purple nitrogen red oxygen gas April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken near the end of the display on the 18th April around 01.55hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75135ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora hayrake rays Aberdeenshire Jim Henderson photo spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.40hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75134ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Cassiopeia hayrake wheel silhouette rays Aberdeenshire spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.38hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75133ajhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights hayrake wheel silhouette stars several rays Aberdeenshire spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.37 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the space of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75131ajhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights Cassiopeia stars several rays Aberdeenshire spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.36 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the psace of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75128ajhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Banchory Cassiopeia red purple nitrogen Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road just east of Banchory from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.36 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the psace of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75127ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Crathes Cassiopeia red purple nitrogen Deeside spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.35 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas and this is one of several taken over the psace of 5-7 minutes illustrating the ever changing nature of an active display. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75119ajhp 
 British Aurora Borealis clouds red purple colours rays April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.25 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75116ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Northern Lights clouds red purple rays strong arc April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.17 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Neuk au75114ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora new display clouds Deeside red purple rays arc April spring 1990 taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the 18th April at 01.12 hrs BST is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more colour saturated although slightly more visual than would be seen with the human eye. What cannot be recorded is the amount of movement of the rays especially when tracking right to left. In some of the photos there is a hint of purple evidence of nitrogen gas being excited as against the more common occurrence of red and green oxygen gas. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, streaming, flaming, moving, movement, active, activity, bright, patches, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, April, 18th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71819ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Ley tree dying down red rays winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 23.20hrs UT as it started to die down and was one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen pushed the development 2 stops. They were exposed around the 15 seconds sligthly less than the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Potarch au72912ajhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland Cassiopeia headlights Deeside purple rays nitrogen spring March 1990 taken on the road from Feughside Inn to Potarch by the Shooting Greens and the lights at the bottom are car headlights on the North Deeside Road near the Potarch Bridge looking northwards over Suie. This display on the 27th March at 21.30hrs UT and was one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around 20 seconds as about the best combination with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Feughside, Feugh, water, Strachan, Finzean, Potarch, Shooting, Greens, road, River, Dee, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Potarch au72910ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Potarch road Deeside purple rays nitrogen spring March 1990 taken on the road from Feughside Inn to Potarch by the Shooting Greens and the lights at the bottom are car headlights on the North Deeside Road near the Potarch Bridge looking northwards over Suie. This display on the 27th March at 21.30hrs UT and was one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around 20 seconds as about the best combination with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Feughside, Feugh, water, Strachan, Finzean, Potarch, Shooting, Greens, road, River, Dee, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, headlights, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Finzean au7294ajhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Finzean road Feughside Deeside purple rays nitrogen winter March 1990 taken on the road from Finzean which is to the west of Banchory on Feughside, following the course of the Water of Feugh on the long straight before Feughside Inn and the turn off to Potarch by the Shooting Greens. This display on the 27th March at 21.15hrs UT and was one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around 20 seconds as about the best combination with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Feughside, Feugh, water, Strachan, Finzean, Potarch, Shooting, Greens, road, River, Dee, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, March, 27th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP 11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7169jhp 
 British Northern Lights telephone poles red yellow colours winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February photographed around 21.40hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7168jhp 
 Scottish aircraft strobe lights Aurora Borealis red colour Deeside February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.50hrs UT as it started to come active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. The line of dots are the landing lights from commercila aircraft on approach to landing at Aberdeen Airport and in those days no flights could land after 10.00pm. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7167jhp 
 Scottish Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis rays many arc more active February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.45hrs UT as it started to ceome active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7165jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis early arc active stage telephone pole Deeside winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.45hrs UT as it started to ceome active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7164jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis early beginning ray arc active building tree winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.42hrs UT as it started to ceome active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7163jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis early stage ray arc active Ley tree winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.40hrs UT as it started to ceome active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71630jhp 
 Scotland Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis display dying colours red sky tree winter display 1990 February taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 22.35hrs UT with this current phase dying down. There was some more subdued activity on the morning of the 21st February around 01.45hrs but my slides hardly record anything. This was one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.
These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71626jhp 
 Scottish Deeside Aurora display quiet dying colours Banchory winter display 1990 February taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 22.30hrs UT with this current phase dying down and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.
These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71616jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display pole multiple red rays colours strong arc winter display 1990 February taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 22.07hrs UT with this current phase beginning to die down and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.
These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71615jhp 
 Scotland Aurora pole multiple red rays colourful winter display 1990 February taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 22.05hrs UT with this current phase beginning to die down and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.
These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71613jhp 
 Scotland Merry Dancers Aurora pole mulitple rays folding arc colourful winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February taken around 22.00hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71612jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights pole mulitple rays folding arc colours winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February taken approx 21.57hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71611jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights pole red rays over exposed star trails colours winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February taken at 21.57hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71610jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights pole red rays high colours Banchory winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February taken around 21.55hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61041jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis underexposed grainy rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an underexposed example while bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610415jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example with an exposure near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610410jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example and bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61058jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display ray single Plough Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61054jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint multiple rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610536jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis rays red clouds moving shapes Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the end of my first film, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610535jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye strong rays red clouds patterns autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610533jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Northern Lights display rays red clouds stars autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610531jhp 
 Scotland photo Aurora Borealis display rays pink clouds windy shapes autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61052jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye overexposed rays trailing stars red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610527jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis night sky strong multiple rays red Arc autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610526jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Glen Dye many strong bright rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610525jhp 
 Scottish active Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays large red clouds autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610524jhp 
 Scotland Merry Dancers display rays red stars several Aurora autumn September 26th & 27th 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610523jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red long exposure clouds 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610521jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Clachnaben hill rays mulitple red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610520jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display rays red clouds Jim Henderson Photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the first film I tried out, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61051jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye rays clouds first photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo was the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible and some rays visible through the gaps. This was probably an underexposure, maybe 10 seconds or so. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610517jhp 
 Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint rays clouds gaps autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617120jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis maximum bright strong display winter hills Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617119jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Boxing Day December rays bright Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617118jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Boxing Day west rays Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, multiple, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617117jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis moving ray red headlights Boxing Day Aberdeenshire December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617115jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights multiple rays arc red yellow display 1989 Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617114jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis several rays moving arc hill starting display Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617113jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis early stage arc active Cairn O'Mount rays display Boxing Day December 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617111jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis arc start display Aberdeenshire Jim Henderson Photograph Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61065jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Clachnaben hill torr Glen Dye autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, upright, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610615jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Glen Dye red purple gas September 1989 slide film taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610613jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis red display Glen Dye earliest first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610612jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Plough stars Glen Dye Aberdeenshire first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610611jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Ursa Major red rays display Glen Dye earliest first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured

Egypt > Luxor Nobles Tombs (11 files)

Photographs in this gallery are of the various Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank if the Nile at Luxor in the area called Qurnet Murai
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG00679jhp 
 Egyptian Luxor Tombs Nobles Nakht grapes fish ducks food preparing Tomb Relief is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG00678jhp 
 Egypt ancient food Nakht grapes figs fish ducks baskets food feast pile Tomb Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, upright, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG00677jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Astronomer Nakht honey wine food feast colours wall painting Tomb Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, upright, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG00676jhp 
 Egyptian Luxor Tombs Nobles Nakht female harp player Tomb painted Relief is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, musicians, women, flute, lute, harp, naked, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG00675jhp 
 Egyptian Luxor Tomb Noble Nakht food feast Tomb Colour Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, upright, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG00674jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Nakht Tomb women servant lotus flower Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG00673jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Nakht women musicians naked Tomb Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, musicians, women, flute, lute, harp, naked, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG00672jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Nakht grapes food feast pile Tomb Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG006714jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Nakht Tomb tree Goddess Hathor food feast papyrus Colours Relief is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG006713jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Nakht grapes wine making workmen Tomb Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, upright, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG006712jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tomb Noble Nakht grapes treading wine fowls workers Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
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