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Searching all stock for "sky":

Aurora over Scotland (314 files)

Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights displays photographed taken over Aberdeeshire in Scotland since 1989 covering some 350 events with arc, rays, coronas with a wide rnage of shapes and colours
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213981jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Orion Pleiades Corona green zenith celestial wings from Tomnaverie Bronze Age stone circle site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south the last of the digital photos was taken at 00.18.10hrsUT for 10secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213980jhp 
 Scotland flanker monolith Aurora Borealis Orion Pleiades Corona green zenith wings Tomnaverie Bronze Age stone circle site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 00.17.20hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213979jhp 
 Scotland flanker Stones Aurora Borealis south Pleiades Corona green zenith wings Tomnaverie Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 00.16.23hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213978jhp 
 Scottish flanker above Aurora Borealis south Orion Pleiades Corona zenith wings Tomnaverie Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 00.15.11hrsUT for 17secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213977jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis south Orion Pleiades Tarland Tomnaverie Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 00.14.32hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213975jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis above flanker red colours rays North Tarland Tomnaverie Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the north in the direction of Tarland was taken at 00.12.47hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213974jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona red colours rays Plough North Tarland Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the north in the direction of Tarland was taken at 00.12.18hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213973jhp 
 Scotttish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona arms colours rays Tarland Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the north west in the direction of Morven was taken at 00.00.36hrsUT for 14secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213970jhp 
 Deeside Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona dome rays Tarland Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the north west in the direction of Tarland was taken at 23.58.42hrsUT for 15secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213967jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona rays recumbent Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.56.31hrsUT for 12secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213959jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona red green rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.27.22hrsUT for 20secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213956jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis corona building red green rays dome stone Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.25.12hrsUT for 15secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213955jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis corona building red green rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.24.10hrsUT for 15secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213954jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis sweeping red green rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.23.29hrsUT for 14secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213952jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis sweeping red rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.21.36hrsUT for 19secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213951jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis sweeping arms Stars rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.20.58hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213949jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Northern Lights Corona Orion Stars red rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.19.04hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213947jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona Orion Stars rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.15.05hrsUT for 16secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213946jhp 
 Scotland Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona activity rays Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.13.18hrsUT for 15secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213943jhp 
 British Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona dome zenith Pleiades Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.08.44hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213942jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona dome Pleiades Tomnaverie flanker Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo of a new surge in the display and strong development of a coronal zenith to the south was taken at 23.08.14hrsUT for 10secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213941jhp 
 Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona Orion flanker red ray Tarland Deeside winter Scotland Tomnaverie recumbent and flankers of the Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo was taken at 22.57.10hrsUT for 13secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213940jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle RSC Aurora Borealis Corona west red ray Tarland Deeside Scotland Tomnaverie recumbent and flankers of the Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo was taken at 22.56.13hrsUT for 12secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera, upright
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213939jhp 
 Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona Orion red ray Tomnaverie Deeside Scotland recumbent and flankers of the Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo was taken at 22.55.46hrsUT for 11secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Aurora over Stone Circle SO0213937jhp 
 Scottish Stone Circle Aurora Borealis Corona Orion red ray Deeside Scotland Tomnaverie recumbent and flankers of the Bronze Age site near Tarland on Royal Deeside in Aberdeenshire Scotland to the west of Aberdeen. Unusually this evening of ongoing activity started around 16.00 hours as a major storm on 20th November 2003. This digital photo was taken at 22.34.58hrsUT for 8secs and these cf139 digital photos were taken at 800ISO, I think I felt the power of the display justified a stop down from my usual 1600ISO setting hoping perhaps for better noise control but this early exposure is on the short side. In hindsight this was to be one of the last major storms I witnessed on Deeside to date, 2018 culminating for me at Tomnaverie Recumbent Stone Circle near Tarland until after midnight, busy evening and in a sense the most spiritual experience I had photographing Aurora displays. I imagine those in the Bronze Age, without light pollution issues, would have often seen them as well. I had to leave Crooktree at 18.30 to teach at Aboyne where my photography students got dragged out to witness the continuing display and then went from there to Tomnaverie. The evenings’ displays were taken with both digital and slide film and the first slide film photos started at around 17.40hrsUT. The magnetometer on site showed vigorous activity from 15.30hrs. This digital photo was taken with a Fujifilm Finepix Digital S2Pro camera using a Sigma 15mm f2.8 fisheye lens, giving a fairly undistorted wide angle image, wide open aperture with most exposures manually near the 20 seconds mark which experience suggested was around the best exposure for the low light Aurora displays. These were digital recordings taken during 2003 when the quality of digital cameras had at last matched 35mm slide film standards and the noise factor was superior to the grain created pushing 400asa slide film to 1600asa. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Aurora, Borealis, Corona, 2003, November, winter, east, west, south, north, Tarland, Tomnaverie, Recumbent, Stone, Circle, flankers, Bronze, Age, zenith, crown, centre, dome, Arc, Rays, wings, sweeping, arms, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, stars, constellations, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, Pleiades, Orion, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, cycle, maximum, minimum, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, oxygen, gas, Van, Ellen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, peaceful, quiet, religious, magical, mystical, spiritual, moon, columns, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, cold, frosty, dark, night, sky, nights, night-time, seconds, time, exposure, tripod, cable, release, 35mm, DSLR, Fujifilm, Finepix, S2Pro, Sigma, 15mm Fisheye, early, afternoon, digital, camera
Deeside Aurora bnm6451jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland spring Northern Lights waning display rays purple red Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 8 seconds at 21.47.18hrsUT and was my last exposure as it almost disappeared at this stage. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6448jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish spring Lights display rays purple red Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 12 seconds at 21.46.17hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, nitrogen, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6447jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland spring display multiple rays colourful Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 11 seconds at 21.45.53hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6446jhp 
 Aurora Borealis British March display rays colours shooting star Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Small meteor burn out visible about 1/3 in from left just in the faint purple band. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 12 seconds at 21.45.39hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Meteor, shooting star, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6445jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish spring display rays colours blue red pink Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Colours not visible to the human eye to the brightness this photo records. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO3200 for 7.4 seconds at 21.45.30hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6444jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish March spring display rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint multiple rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 3200 for 6.9 seconds at 21.45.19hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora bnm6443jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland March spring display start Arc Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 27th March, 2017 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 21.43UT and was indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch. Although cloud was forecast earlier the display happened before the cloud arrived but when it got dark enough to see it. A low grade Arc was visible to the North, beneath Cassiopeia at 21.44, it went active shortly afterwards with faint rays with bright bases on the arc and some lateral movement, North to West and it died down again very quickly at 21.47UT, allowing approximately 10 exposures. Magnetometer suggested possible further activity but by 22.00 there was 100% cloud cover. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 3200 for 12 seconds at 21.44.13hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 10 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, red, blue, purple, faint, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, brief, night, spring, March, 2017, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora au721112ajhp 
 Scotland Auroral Glow airglow Neuk Crathes Banchory Deeside spring 1990 night sky taken on the Harestone Road from the small pull off at The Neuk Farm which the local farmer used as an area to dump his old hayrake and a few bales of straw. Taken on the morning of 9th October at 00.35hrs UT was observed as a regular occurrence on nights preceding active Aurora displays and the Auroral Glow was described in Neil Bone’s The Aurora: Sun-Earth Interactions p112 as against airglow see p147. This was in the days of no Internet predictive sites like Spaceweather.com and the only way I could see displays was to sit on every clear night and watch the skies. This noticeably brighter night sky, rather like twilight that should not have been there at midnight in October encouraged me to make sure of being on site the following evening, in this case at 21.47hrs UT on the 9th when the glow was visible. Activity started around 22.15 with faint beams visible. I have already added other photos taken using Fuji RSP-416 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 1600asa-pushed 2 stops. They were exposed around 20secs which from experience I had settled on as about the best combination of film, exposure time and with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Neuk, hayrake, farm, entrance, layby, Aurora, Borealis, Auroral Glow, airglow, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, oxygen, nitrogen, moonlight, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, blue, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, October, winter, 9th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP, RSP-416, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Comet Hyakutake au9679jhp 
 Comet Hyakutake April Aurora display 1996 spring Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 17th April 1996 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 23.00 BSThrs between Kincardine O’Neil and Torphins on Deeside with Cassiopeia sitting in the centre a spring marker for the northern sky. The Comet is to the left with its tail by and to the centre the distinct purple hue of a nitrogen gas Aurora display above a cloud bank. I started photographing the Comet on the 24th and finished 17th April when I was able to include this Aurora display. This photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP processed for a 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 28mm f2.8 lens wide open at around 20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Kincardine O’Neil, north, Comet, Hyakutake, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, Torphins, Arc, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, 1996, April, spring, landscape, photos, photographs, tail, green, bluish, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, nitrogen, purple, blue, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 35mm, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP, RSP-412, exposed, time, long, Nikon, FM2, 28mm
Comet Hyakutake au9667jhp 
 Comet Hyakutake April Aurora display 1996 spring Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 14th April 1996 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 23.55BSThrs between Kincardine O’Neil and Torphins on Deeside with Cassiopeia sitting off to the right quarter a spring marker for the northern sky. The Comet is to the left of bottom centre with its tail by the first twig and to the right above is the distinct purple hue of a nitrogen gas Aurora display. I started photographing the Comet on the 24th and finished 17th April when I was able to include two Aurora displays. This photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP processed for a 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 28mm f2.8 lens wide open at around 20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Kincardine O’Neil, north, Comet, Hyakutake, Aurora Borealis, Aurora, Borealis, display, Torphins, Arc, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, Cassiopeia, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, 1996, April, spring, landscape, photos, photographs, tail, green, bluish, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, nitrogen, purple, blue, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 35mm, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP, RSP-412, exposed, time, long, Nikon, FM2, 28mm
Comet Hyakutake au96133jhp 
 Comet Hyakutake March 1996 tail colours long Plough Scottish Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 25th March 1996 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 23.50hrsUT between Kincardine O’Neil and Torphins on Deeside with part of The Plough Constellation visible a spring marker for the northern sky. I started photographing the Comet on the 24th and finished 17th April when I was able to include an Aurora display. This photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP processed for a 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 50mm f1.8 lens wide open at around 10 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Kincardine O’Neil, north, Comet, Hyakutake, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, 1996, March, spring, landscape, photos, photographs, tail, green, ion, ice, bluish, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 35mm, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP, RSP-412, exposed, time, long, Nikon, FM2, 50mm
Comet Hyakutake au96116jhp 
 Comet Hyakutake March 1996 night sky spring Deeside Aberdeenshire Scotland taken on the evening of the 24th March 1996 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen looking to north. This photo was taken at 22.00hrsUT between Kincardine O’Neil and Torphins on Deeside with part of The Plough Constellation visible a spring marker for the northern sky. I started photographing the Comet on the 24th and finished 17th April when I was able to include an Aurora display. This photo was scanned from a 35mm colour slide film, Fuji RSP processed for a 1600asa rating using a Nikon FM2, 50mm f1.8 lens wide open at around 10 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Kincardine O’Neil, north, Comet, Hyakutake, Plough, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, 1996, March, spring, landscape, photos, photographs, tail, green, bluish, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, 35mm, slide, scanned, Fuji, RSP, RSP-412, exposed, time, long, Nikon, FM2, 50mm
Low Grade Aurora bnm5755jhp 
 Aurora Borealis display Deeside Scotland autumn rays green Plough low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the fourth of four exposures when additonal rays were observed and then they disappeared. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 14 seconds at 23.29hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5754jhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland autumn 2016 faint mulitple rays green Plough low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the third of four exposures when additonal rays were observed. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 14 seconds at 23.28hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5753jhp 
 Northern Lights arc Scottish October 2016 faint rays low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the second of four exposures when additonal rays were observed. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 13 seconds at 23.24hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5752jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish autumn faint rays low grade display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 28th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and was the first of four exposures when additonal rays were observed. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 12 seconds at 23.23hrsUT. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Low Grade Aurora bnm5740jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland autumn very faint rays poor quality display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the morning of 26th October [after midnight BST], 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, indicated by the magnetometer readings on AuroraWatch and although I did not see anything defined this one expsoure suggests a faint ray above the central tree. One of the first nights without a cloud problem to the North and what I suspected were faint rays proved correct when the photographs were processed. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f5.6 aperture, ISO setting of 6400 for 11 seconds at 23.27hrsUT which was slightly underexposed. The increased ISO sensitivity of modern DSLR’s allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Lights, Merry, Dancers, Ursa Major, Big Dipper, Plough, North, landscape, CME, solar, wind, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, faint, weak, low, grade, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, autumn, October, 2016, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora The Ley au71819ajhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Ley tree dying down red rays winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 23.20hrs UT as it started to die down and was one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP11 35mm slide film rated at 1600asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen pushed the development 2 stops. They were exposed around the 15 seconds sligthly less than the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7169jhp 
 British Northern Lights telephone poles red yellow colours winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February photographed around 21.40hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7168jhp 
 Scottish aircraft strobe lights Aurora Borealis red colour Deeside February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.50hrs UT as it started to come active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. The line of dots are the landing lights from commercila aircraft on approach to landing at Aberdeen Airport and in those days no flights could land after 10.00pm. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7167jhp 
 Scottish Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis rays many arc more active February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.45hrs UT as it started to ceome active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7165jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis early arc active stage telephone pole Deeside winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.45hrs UT as it started to ceome active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7164jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis early beginning ray arc active building tree winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.42hrs UT as it started to ceome active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au7163jhp 
 British Aurora Borealis early stage ray arc active Ley tree winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February this one around 21.40hrs UT as it started to ceome active and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71630jhp 
 Scotland Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis display dying colours red sky tree winter display 1990 February taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 22.35hrs UT with this current phase dying down. There was some more subdued activity on the morning of the 21st February around 01.45hrs but my slides hardly record anything. This was one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.
These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71626jhp 
 Scottish Deeside Aurora display quiet dying colours Banchory winter display 1990 February taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 22.30hrs UT with this current phase dying down and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.
These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71616jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display pole multiple red rays colours strong arc winter display 1990 February taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 22.07hrs UT with this current phase beginning to die down and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.
These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71615jhp 
 Scotland Aurora pole multiple red rays colourful winter display 1990 February taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February around 22.05hrs UT with this current phase beginning to die down and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle.
These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71613jhp 
 Scotland Merry Dancers Aurora pole mulitple rays folding arc colourful winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February taken around 22.00hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71612jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights pole mulitple rays folding arc colours winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February taken approx 21.57hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71611jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights pole red rays over exposed star trails colours winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February taken at 21.57hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora The Ley au71610jhp 
 Scottish Northern Lights pole red rays high colours Banchory winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February of which this is the 20th February taken around 21.55hrs UT and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. I have already added other photos taken during this same display but using Fuji RSP11 film stock so it was a busy night but activity waxes and wanes so there are bursts of active bright displays followed by very subdued periods with little activity, maybe some flashes or a general colour hue in the sky. I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 35mm slide film rated at 400asa and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen for 800asa. They were exposed around the 15-20 seconds around the 20secs I later settled on as about the best combined with a 28mm or 24mm f2.8 wide angle lens so these are much brighter and more saturated. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90’s there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90’s, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 20th, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, 800asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61041jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis underexposed grainy rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an underexposed example while bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610415jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example with an exposure near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610410jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example and bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617023jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis dying phase Northern sky faint rays yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617018jhp 
 Scotrish Aurora Borealis northwards night sky bright multiple rays yellow red winter 11th December 1989 taken on the north face of the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the early ones, I think the third display, I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated by Fuji at 1600asa and possibly exposed shorter than the 20 seconds I later settled on and hence the darker and slightly stronger grain effect but actually far more accurate in terms of the human eye perception of a display. It was active around 22.30 to about 23.45 GMT/UT. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about my first display of the 23 September and probably about the one captured here. The large dark post is one of the snow poles that line the side of the Cairn road. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, December, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61058jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display ray single Plough Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61054jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint multiple rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610536jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis rays red clouds moving shapes Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the end of my first film, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610535jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye strong rays red clouds patterns autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610533jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Northern Lights display rays red clouds stars autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610531jhp 
 Scotland photo Aurora Borealis display rays pink clouds windy shapes autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61052jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye overexposed rays trailing stars red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610527jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis night sky strong multiple rays red Arc autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610526jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Glen Dye many strong bright rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610525jhp 
 Scottish active Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays large red clouds autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610524jhp 
 Scotland Merry Dancers display rays red stars several Aurora autumn September 26th & 27th 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610523jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red long exposure clouds 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610521jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Clachnaben hill rays mulitple red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610520jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display rays red clouds Jim Henderson Photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the first film I tried out, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61051jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye rays clouds first photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo was the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible and some rays visible through the gaps. This was probably an underexposure, maybe 10 seconds or so. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610517jhp 
 Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint rays clouds gaps autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617120jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis maximum bright strong display winter hills Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617119jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Boxing Day December rays bright Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617118jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Boxing Day west rays Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, multiple, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617117jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis moving ray red headlights Boxing Day Aberdeenshire December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617115jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights multiple rays arc red yellow display 1989 Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617114jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis several rays moving arc hill starting display Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617113jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis early stage arc active Cairn O'Mount rays display Boxing Day December 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617111jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis arc start display Aberdeenshire Jim Henderson Photograph Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61065jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Clachnaben hill torr Glen Dye autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, upright, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610615jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Glen Dye red purple gas September 1989 slide film taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610613jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis red display Glen Dye earliest first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610612jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Plough stars Glen Dye Aberdeenshire first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610611jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Ursa Major red rays display Glen Dye earliest first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Deeside bnm1931jhp 
 Merry Dancers Scottish display March green rays stars westerly view Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.42.29UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1954jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland bright strong green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.51.42UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, bright, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1951jhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland bright red green rays Aberdeenshire March Deeside taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.50.59UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1942jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland multiple rays streaming Deeside Aberdeenshire display west taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.47.59UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, streaming, flaring, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1939jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish many flaming rays Jim Henderson Photo experiment taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.47.37UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, flaming, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1937jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green arc red rays Cassiopeia trees Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.44.50UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, Cassiopeia, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1934jhp 
 Norther Lights westwards Scottish photograph spring green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.43.51UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1922jhp 
 Aurora Lights display Scotland bright flaming yellow rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.39.00UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, 50mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1918jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish hotspot streaming green arc active rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one taken at 21.36.52UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This particular photograph was an experiment using a 50mm f1.8 lens and using very short exposures of 2-5 secs at 3200ISO as there was substantially more movement in this far more compact area of activity however depth of field effect is significant as seen in the out of focus trees whereas in similar views using the 24mm lens it is hardly noticeable. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, westwards, flaming, patching, streaming, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, 50mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1917jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish spring green bright strong rays Aberdeenshire trees silhouette taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.36.04UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, westerwards, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1912jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland March westerly trees dyke green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this photo at 21.33.37UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, upright, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1909jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish display west early spring green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.32.19UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1908jhp 
 Merry Dancers Northern Scotland green red rays easterly Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm this one at 21.32.00UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, north, eastwards, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1906jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland westwards green rays red display Cassiopeia Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.31.25UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, Cassiopeia, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1905jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish display north house spring green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.30.28UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, Cassiopeia, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1901jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Cassiopeia green arc west trees Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, upright, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1900jhp 
 Aurora red ray west Orion stars forest Scotland spring Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, taken at 20.50.33Ut, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, Orion, Pleiades, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1897jhp 
 Northern Lights Scottish Cassiopeia westwards spring green red trees Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 21.48.11, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, Cassiopeia, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1896jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish shed roof northwards March green double arc Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.46.53UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, Cassiopeia, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1961jhp 
 Aurora rays arc village lights Scottish Deeside March green red Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this at 21.54.30UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1959jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Torphins later stage green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this at 21.54.00, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This photo was one of several taken with the display active again around 9.30pm during a second phase of activity from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right towards the end of the overall display around 10pm. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1957jhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland photo spring green rays Torphins village Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this at 21.53.03UT, and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This photo was one of several taken with the display active again around 9.30pm during a second phase of activity from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right towards the end of the overall display around 10pm. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1904jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish display spring night green red rays Torphins Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this at 21.30.09UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
This photo was one of several taken with the display active again around 9.30pm during a second phase of activity from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right towards the end of the overall display around 10pm. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1892jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland light pollution Torphins lights arc rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.29.36UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. This photo was one of several taken with the display active around 8.20pm from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, pollution, light, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1887jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Torphins village spring green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.28.44UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. This photo was one of several taken with the display active around 8.20pm from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1881jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Torphins March green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.25.45UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. This photo was one of several taken with the display active around 8.20pm from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1878jhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland Torphins spring green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.24.51UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. This photo was one of several taken with the display active around 8.20pm from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1874jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland tree spring green ray patch Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.23.24UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. This photo was one of several taken with the display active around 8.20pm from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1869jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland early stage green rays village Torphins east Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.21.22UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. This photo was one of several taken with the display active around 8.20pm from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Torphins bnm1866jhp 
 Aurora Lights Scottish spring start green rays over Torphins Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.20.29UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. This photo was one of several taken with the display active around 8.20pm from an arc lying eastwards across Torphins whose house and street lights are visible at the bottom right. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1889jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland house chimney pot active spring green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm and this was into the second stage of activity at 20.29.36UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1862jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland photo spring green arc Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.18.03UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, upright, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1860jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish photo spring green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.16.03UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1855jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland early photo March green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.14.25UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1853jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish house roof spring green red rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.08.29 UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, upright, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1850jhp 
 Northern Lights above house Scotland spring green red mauve Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 20.07.29 and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, mauve, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1847jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland photo spring early red ray Aberdeenshire arc green taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 19.58.52UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside bnm1845jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish photo green arc start March Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the evening of 6th March, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen, starting around 8.00pm, this one at 19.58.17UT and is the first display since the one that spanned the New Year. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm/28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 aperture and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for shorter exposures circa 12 sec average times giving more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were sometimes not ideal because of passing snow flurries but the second burst of activity around 9.30 until nearly 10.00pm was in good clear conditions although cold. It had not been telegraphed from the Spaceweather site which was indicating possible displays caused by the solar wind but likely to occur much further North. During the early stage of the arc developing and going active there were several rays above the viewer but not powerful enough to develop into a half Corona. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, March, 2016, Mother’s Day, D700, Nikon, DSLR, 24mm, 28mm, Nikkor, prime, lens, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Deeside Aurora 2016 vbn1777jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland last 2016 photo faint display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 1st January, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 01.06UT 2016 with a secondary active phase of the evenings display which started some 1 hour earlier beginning to die down and this photo gives a pretty accurate illustration of how the display would look to the eye with perhaps less of a green hue than this slightly enhanced photo shows. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 16 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2016 vbn1774jhp 
 Aurora Borealis January 2016 Scottish green patches Deeside Aberdeenshire northwards taken on the 1st January, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end of the year 2015 gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 01.02UT 2016 with the active phase of the evenings display which started some 1 hour earlier shutting down. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 18 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2016 vbn1770jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern Lights rays red green Northwards Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 1st January, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 01.01UT 2016 with the a secondary active phase of the evenings display which started some 1 hour earlier. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 10 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2016 vbn1769jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter green rays oxygen North Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 1st January, 2016 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 01.01UT 2016 with the active phase of the evenings display which started some 1 hour earlier beginning a slight recovery. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 11 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2016 vbn1767jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Torphisn New Year fireworks Scottish green patches rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.07UT with the ARC a precursor to an active phase of the evenings display which started some 30 mins later. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 10 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2016 vbn1760jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland first New Year 2016 display Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 00.01UT 2016 with an active phase ongoing of the evenings display which started some 15 mins earlier. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 12 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1759jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green rays last 2015 display Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.59UT 2015 with an active phase ongoing of the evenings display which started some 10 mins earlier. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 13 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green colour is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1757jhp 
 Aurora Borealis green arc strong rays red edge oxygen Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.59UT 2015 with the most active phase of the evenings display which started some 10 mins earlier. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 20secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1755jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter green red rays arc Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.58UT 2015 with the ARC turning to an active phase of the evenings display which started some 10 mins before and a hint of red in the stronger ray. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 13secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1752jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Merry Dancers Scottish green arc rays westwards Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.56UT 2015 with the ARC towards the west a precursor of an active phase of the evenings display which had just started. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 20 secs. This is taken looking west of North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1749jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green double arc arcs rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.55UT with the ARC deveoping into a double as the first active phase of the evenings display dies down, a common pattern although in this case the display started a slow decline despite another small surge of activity as in vbn1777 an hour or so later. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 18 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1747jhp 
 Aurora Borealis December winter Scotland double green arc Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.53UT 2015 with the ARC re-establishing itself after an active phase of the evenings display and a suggestion of secondary arc developing lower down. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 13 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1746jhp 
 Aurora Borealis west winter Scottish green arc active start Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.52UT with an active phase of the evenings display towards the west with an array of small rays and a red oxygen hue appearing as the display increases in power-green excitation is the lower power level colour of oxygen. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 12 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1742jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland green oxygen rays arc Deeside Aberdeenshire farm lights taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.36UT 2015 with the ARC a precursor to an active phase beginning to start the evenings display with rays appearing. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 20 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1740jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish Northern Lights green arc rays active Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.34UT 2015 with the ARC moving to an active phase of the evenings display with rays breaking upwards towards the North. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 13 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1737jhp 
 Aurora Borealis December Jim Henderson photograph green arc Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.31UT with the ARC a precursor to the active phase of the evenings display which starting with rays breaking off the arc. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 12 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1733jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green arc Torphins eastwards street lights Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.12UT 2015 with the ARC a precursor to an active phase of the evenings display which starts some 10 mins later. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 11 secs. This is taken looking due east of North, with the lights of Torphins and a cloud bank and the green colour hue is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1731jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland westwards green arc low grade early stage Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.11UT with the ARC a precursor to an active phase of the evenings display which starts some 20 mins later. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 11 secs. This is taken looking due West of North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1728jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green arc faint rays activity North Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.10UT 2015 with the ARC a precursor to an active phase of the evenings display which starts some 20 mins later. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 12 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Deeside Aurora 2015 vbn1726jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter Scottish green arc Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 31st December, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen caused over the UK from a glancing CME and a timely end to the year gift given that the previous three displays I missed because of cloud cover.

This photo was taken at 23.07UT 2015 from the cottage with the ARC a precursor to an active phase of the evenings display which starts some 30 mins later. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO setting of 3200 with an exposure time of 10 secs. This is taken looking due North and the green tinge is from low level oxygen gas at Crooktree, located between Torphins to the right and Craigton Hill and Kincardine O'Neil to the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney, December, 2015, digital, D700, Nikon, Nikkor, prime, lens
Aurora Deeside vbn0367jhp 
 Aurora Borealis photo summer Scottish cottage green Royal Deeside Grampian taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.27hrsUT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f8 and ISO settings of 6400 which allows for much shorter exposure circa 8 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0366jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland photograph summer clouds August green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.26hrsUT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f8 and ISO settings of 6400 which allows for much shorter exposure circa 8 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0365jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland very fast ISO experiment noise green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f8 and ISO settings of 25600 which allows for extremely short exposure circa 5 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events and the noise factor was not unacceptable at this ISO setting. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0364jhp 
 Aurora Borealis photo high ISO experiment noise short exposure summer Scottish green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.26hrsUT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f8 and ISO settings of 25600 which allows for greatly shorter exposure circa 3.5 sec with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events and in this experiment noise is not unacceptable. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0362jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland photograph Jim Henderson unusual summer moonlight Scottish green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.26hrsUT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f8 and ISO settings of 25600 which allowed for an extremely short exposure of 1.2 sec with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events although noise is noticeable becuase of a degree of underexposure with this stopped down aperture-further experiments are planned at f2.8. at this sort of expsoure time and also with the camera on auto rather than manual. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0349jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern Lights Scotland summer Scottish green rays Royal Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.20hrsUT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f8 and ISO settings of 6400 which allows for much shorter exposure circa 4 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0345jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland photograph summer green rays clouds Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.19hrsUT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for much shorter exposure circa 6 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure
Aurora Deeside vbn0342jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Scottish image summer green rays moonlight Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.19hrsUT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for much shorter exposure circa 6 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0341jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Northern Lights pic summer August green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.19hrsUT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for much shorter exposure circa 4 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0339jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland display summer Scottish soft green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.18hrsUT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for much shorter exposure circa 12 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0336jhp 
 Aurora Borealis rays photo summer Scottish green Jim Henderson Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015, 23.17UT at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen and the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for much shorter exposure circa 9 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, Grampian, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure, photo, photos, photography, photograph
Aurora Deeside vbn0331jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland photo summer Scottish green rays Deeside Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th August, 2015 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeenand the first display since February 2014. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens and ISO settings of 3200 which allows for much shorter exposure circa 6 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The light conditions were not perfect as the background light was from the full moon but dispels any myths that Aurora’s cannot be seen under such conditions. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, August, 2015, summer, moonlight, full, moon, moonlight, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, tripod, time, exposure
Aurora August Summer Display AB98913JHP 
 Aurora Borealis summer August Scotland Deeside nitrogen purple rays Plough gas taken around midnight BST in North East Scotland on the 26th August 1998 just before midnight this Aurora display proves that even with the height of summer light nights displays are visible and the Aurora is not just a winter event that happens on frosty nights. The strong purple colour is indicative of nitrogen gas excitation as well as the lighter light levels of summetime night sky. Fuji slide film pushed processed to 1600asa and taken with a Nikon FM2 body and 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens with an exposure around 15-20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, summer, August, landscape, 2004, SLR, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, nitrogen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, time-exposure, slide, film
Aurora Spring Rays ab0326jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Rays arc spring Deeside Scotland red rays Cassiopeia photo taken on the 30th March, 2003 around 22.30hrs looking northwards towards Cassiopeia a good marker for the northern spring night sky here located some 25 miles west of Aberdeen. This photo was taken on the evening I first used a DSLR, a Fuji S2 and a comparative image from that source is SM39013. This photo is taken using Fuji slide film pushed processed to 1600asa and taken with a Nikon FM2 body and 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens with an exposure around 15-20 seconds. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Cassiopeia, Arc, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, 2003, spring, SLR, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, film, slide, scanned, Fuji
Aurora First Fuji S2 sm39013jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Rays arc spring Aberdeenshire Scottish red rays Cassiopeia photo taken on the 30th March, 2003 around 22.30hrs looking northwards towards Cassiopeia a good marker for the northern spring night sky here located some 25 miles west of Aberdeen. This photo was taken on the evening I first used this DSLR, a Fuji S2 and a comparative image from that source using slide film is ab0336jhp. The 15mm Sigma f2.8 lens with an exposure of 16 seconds at 1600ISO but because the lens focal length is reduced becuase of the CCD it was equivalent to 19mm. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Aurora Borealis, Cassiopeia, Arc, Rays, Northern Lights, Merry Dancers, 2003, spring, DSLR, Fuji, S2, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time
Aurora Arc Active qwe1713jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland photo winter Scottish arc active rays Deeside taken on the 12th January at 20.22 hrs 2012 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I captured using my Nikon D700 being one of the first photographed since end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens and ISO settings of 6400 which allows for much shorter exposure of 8 secs with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. This was a fairly low grade display with the arc showing patchy activity with rays breaking off at different points. A possible aircraft strobe light is visible on the left handside. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Deeside, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, evening, January, 2012, winter, DSLR, Nikon, D700, Nikkor, wide-angle, lens.
Aurora Deeside jkl8369jhp 
 Aurora Borealis February last photo Scottish faint low grade display green rays Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins with this last phase of photography, this particular image was taken at 22.32 with my efforts overall completing then when activity, although continuing until after midnight, was very faint and photography would have little value. During the earlier part of this phase there were pulsing sheets of light thrown upwards from the horizon into the higher atmosphere but as so low level that they cannot be photographed. This went on during low level activity with faint rays with an occasional stronger but briefly lasting single ray. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8366jhp 
 Aurora Borealis winter Scotland faint low grade display green rays stars Plough Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins with this last phase of photography, this particular image was taken at 22.31 with my efforts overall completing at 22.32 when activity, although continuing until after midnight, was very faint and photography would have little value. During the earlier part of this phase there were pulsing sheets of light thrown upwards from the horizon into the higher atmosphere but as so low level that they cannot be photographed. This went on during low level activity with faint rays with an occasional stronger but briefly lasting single ray. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8365jhp 
 Aurora Borealis winter Plough Ursa Major Scottish display green rays gap north Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins with this last phase of photography, this particular image was taken at 22.30 with my efforts overall completing at 22.32 when activity, although continuing until after midnight, was very faint and photography would have little value. During the earlier part of this phase there were pulsing sheets of light thrown upwards from the horizon into the higher atmosphere but as so low level that they cannot be photographed. This went on during low level activity with faint rays with an occasional stronger but briefly lasting single ray. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8364jhp 
 Aurora Borealis winter Scotland east north faint display green rays Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins with this last phase of photography, this particular image was taken at 22.29 with my efforts overall completing at 22.32 when activity, although continuing until after midnight, was very faint and photography would have little value. During the earlier part of this phase there were pulsing sheets of light thrown upwards from the horizon into the higher atmosphere but as so low level that they cannot be photographed. This went on during low level activity with faint rays with an occasional stronger but briefly lasting single ray. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8359jhp 
 Northern Lights Crooktree west Scottish faint aircraft display green rays Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins with this last phase of photography, this particular image was taken at 22.20 with my efforts overall completing at 22.32 when activity, although continuing until after midnight, was very faint and photography would have little value. During the earlier part of this phase there were pulsing sheets of light thrown upwards from the horizon into the higher atmosphere but as so low level that they cannot be photographed. This went on during low level activity with faint rays with an occasional stronger but briefly lasting single ray. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8356jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Merry Dancers winter Scotland patching faint display green rays Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins with this last phase of photography, this particular image was taken at 22.18 with my efforts overall completing at 22.32 when activity, although continuing until after midnight, was very faint and photography would have little value. During the earlier part of this phase there were pulsing sheets of light thrown upwards from the horizon into the higher atmosphere but as so low level that they cannot be photographed. This went on during low level activity with faint rays with an occasional stronger but briefly lasting single ray. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8351jhp 
 Aurora Borealis winter Scottish faint low grade display green red rays Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins with this last phase of photography, this particular image was taken at 22.14 with my efforts overall completing at 22.30 when activity, although continuing until after midnight, was very faint and photography would have little value. During the earlier part of this phase there were pulsing sheets of light thrown upwards from the horizon into the higher atmosphere but as so low level that they cannot be photographed. This went on during low level activity with faint rays with an occasional stronger but briefly lasting single ray. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8346jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Aberdeenshire winter Scottish green rays faint Crooktree Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 22.08, after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable but now generally dying off as the overall strength of the display subdues. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8345jhp 
 Northern Lights meteor shooting star winter Scottish green rays west Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 20.57 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, meteor, shooting, star, westwards, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8342jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern Lights faint quiet period winter Scotland green red rays Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 22.05 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity is in a general dying off as the overall strength of the display subdues. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8341jhp 
 Aurora Borealis westwards faint quiet period Scotland green red ray Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 22.04 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity is in a general dying off as the overall strength of the display subdues. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8340jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Grampian faint quiet phase waning winter Scottish green red rays Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 22.03 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity is in a general dying off as the overall strength of the display subdues. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8338jhp 
 Aurora Borealis faint rays phase waning winter Scotland green red rays Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 22.02 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity is in a general dying off as the overall strength of the display subdues. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8336jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern Lights winter Scottish green red rays Pleiades west Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.59 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8335jhp 
 Aurora Borealis north faint quiet phase waning Scottish green rays Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.56 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity is in a general dying off as the overall strength of the display subdues. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8333jhp 
 Northern Lights Torphins gean tree north winter Scotland green red rays Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.54 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The large tree is a gean and is on the alignment for magentic north. The street lights at the bottom right are Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, gean, tree, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8331jhp 
 Aurora Borealis tree north faint quiet phase waning winter Scotland green red rays Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.53 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity is in a general dying off as the overall strength of the display subdues. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8329jhp 
 Northern Lights Pleiades winter Scottish green red ray tree silhouette Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.52 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8327jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern Lights winter Scottish green rays North Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.52, looking northwards and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8326jhp 
 Aurora Borealis winter Scottish green rays North sheets curtains Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.51 looking northwards and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8323jhp 
 Aurora Borealis west winter Scotland green red ray Pleiades stars Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England. 
It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. 
The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.50 looking westwards and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8321jhp 
 Merry Dancers Northern Lights winter Scottish green red rays display Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.50 looking west and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8319jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern Lights west building fresh display winter Scottish green red rays Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.03 looking westwards as new phase starts to build up and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8315jhp 
 Aurora Borealis display winter Scottish green red rays westwards nitrogen Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 21.00 with a new phase building towards the west after the original arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a hint of nitrogen gas visible alongside the red of oxygen. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8313jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern sky display winter Scottish green red rays Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 20.59, after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8306jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Northern Lights winter Scottish green red rays arc quieter Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

It’s most active phase of the evening’s display was over around 20.30 including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 3200 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 15 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events.

The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 20.57 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeable and a general dying off of the overall strength of the display. This phase sees more individual rays, green towards the northern centre with red rays to the western edges as seen in those with the large trees on the left. The Pleiades Star Constellation is visible in those with the strong red ray on the left. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Pleiades, west, westwards, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8302jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter photo green red rays North Crooktree Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 20.46 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeably. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8301jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Aberdeenshire winter Scottish green red oxygen rays Royal Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 20.45 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeably. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8299jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter Scottish green red rays Royal Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 28mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins, this one was around 20.44 and was after the arc has disappeared and the ray activity continued to the North with red high level oxygen gas colour started to appear more noticeably. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8283jhp 
 Aurora Borealis winter Scottish green red rays large ray westwards Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, upright, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8284jhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland winter red large ray green rays stars Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, upright, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8266jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland Northern Lights green red Plough rays folded arc Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, upright, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8298jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Crooktree cottage meteor winter Scottish green rays Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8295jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter pine trees silhouette green rays red Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8294jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter telephone pole red green rays folded arc Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, upright, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8292jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish display greenred pink rays arc Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, upright, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8290jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland pine trees silhouetted green red rays arc Deeside display taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, upright, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8289jhp 
 Northern Lights Scotland winter green red purple nitrogen rays folded arc Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8286jhp 
 Aurora Merry Dancers Scottish green red purple rays curtains Deeside February display taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8285jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scottish green rays arc Torphins light pollution patching Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, patches, patching, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8282jhp 
 Aurora Borealis display February 2014 photo Scotland green red rays Royal Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, upright, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8280jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter red Plough Ursa Major green rays folded arc Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, upright, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8279jhp 
 Aurora Borealis winter Scottish green rays folded arc Biog Dipper curtains Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8278jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter green red rays folded arc Aberdeenshire taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8277jhp 
 Aurora Merry Dancers winter Scottish green red rays folded arc Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, landscape, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8276jhp 
 Aurora Borealis Scotland winter green red large rays folded arc Royal Deeside taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal Deeside, Deeside, Crooktree, Torphins, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, bright, patches, Northern, Lights, Merry, Dancers, upright, panorama, folded, curtains, CME, solar, night, sky, stars, Plough, Ursa, Major, Big, Dipper, Cassiopeia, oxygen, gas, molecules, magnetic, green, yellow, red, nitrogen, purple, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, celestial, night, morning, February, 2014, pine, trees, silhouette, telephone, pole, cottage, roof, chimney.
Aurora Deeside jkl8275jhp 
 Aurora Northern Lights winter Scottish green red rays arc Deeside Grampian taken on the 27th February, 2014 at Crooktree, 25 miles west of Aberdeen is the first display I have seen this year and the best for several years since the end of the previous Solar Cycle in 2006 although initial forecasts did not suggest a display of this strength was likely over the UK from a glancing CME. It was in fact observed and photographed as far south as Essex in England.

This photo and those up to the cottage roof view where taken between 20.15 and 20.35 and give an idea of how active and varied a display can be in such a short time. It was also the most active phase of the evenings display including a fairly rare occurrence of a folded arc, more common in the most northern regions. This photograph was taken with a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR using a 24mm Nikkor f2.8 lens at f4 and ISO settings of 6400 allowing for much shorter exposure times e.g. circa 10 sec average times with hopefully more accurate recordings of these moving events. The first activity photographed of this display was about 19.50, looking west of North to the west of Torphins. 
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