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Aurora over Scotland > Aurora The Neuk au71517jhp
Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights displays photographed taken over Aberdeeshire in Scotland since 1989 covering some 350 events with arc, rays, coronas with a wide rnage of shapes and colours
Aurora The Neuk au71517jhp 
 British Scottish Aurora Proton beam ray unique strange red light winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. This is porbably one of the most unusual events I photographed as the only sign of a display was this isolated beam of light, red to the eye, a hovering there for several minutes before disappearing without anyother activity. Susequently I have seen this type of structure described as a proton ray or beam rather than the normal electron charged rays of the more classical Aurora displays. I happened to speak to Andy Bradford who saw the same thing at Kincardine O'Neil, several miles to the west around the same time, 20.50hrs UT on the 19th February which ruled out one theory I had of a security light or helicopter pad landing light from Raemoir Hotel. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90ís there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated as and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen at 1600asa, and exposed around the 10 seconds rather than the 20 I later settled on. Several of the photos show a generally poor level of activity and low light levels, not helped by the faster exposure time although to the human eye they bare probably a more accurate representation of what is seen in reality.

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90ís, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, proton, beam, column, light, unusual, rare, unique, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 19th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
© Jim Henderson
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Photographer: Jim Henderson
Collection: Aurora over Scotland
Filename:
Aurora The Neuk au71517jhp
Upload Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2016
Photo Size: 9.5 MB; 3555x5320 pixels
Preview:
  comp 388 x 580

Caption:

British Scottish Aurora Proton beam ray unique strange red light

winter February 1990 taken on the Harestone Road by The Ley tree to the west of Banchory taken at a corner layby opposite the entrance to the Ley Farm which I tended to use more as it was more convenient and this tree at the entrance gave a very striking foreground. This photo was from one of three films taken on the 16th-20th of February and is one of the many displays in early 1990, a decade which proved to be an extremely productive one for Aurora displays and photography. This is porbably one of the most unusual events I photographed as the only sign of a display was this isolated beam of light, red to the eye, a hovering there for several minutes before disappearing without anyother activity. Susequently I have seen this type of structure described as a proton ray or beam rather than the normal electron charged rays of the more classical Aurora displays. I happened to speak to Andy Bradford who saw the same thing at Kincardine O'Neil, several miles to the west around the same time, 20.50hrs UT on the 19th February which ruled out one theory I had of a security light or helicopter pad landing light from Raemoir Hotel. There was activity on the nights of the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th and I found during the 90ís there were often displays several nights in a row as later photos will illustrate whereas after 2006 most displays seem only to last one night and often several months apart so a very different Solar Cycle I took this photo of the Aurora display using the Fuji RSP 11 35mm slide film rated as and developed in this case at my local Lab in Aberdeen at 1600asa, and exposed around the 10 seconds rather than the 20 I later settled on. Several of the photos show a generally poor level of activity and low light levels, not helped by the faster exposure time although to the human eye they bare probably a more accurate representation of what is seen in reality.

These locations became my usual choices for most of the Aurora displays I photographed when living in Banchory throughout the early 90ís, as easily accessible from Banchory and with a clear light pollution free view to the North which meant that any clear night was spent watching the Northern skies for the tell-tale signs of a possible display, usually proceeded by an area of obvious brightness on the evening before the main display. It also gave easy access to Crathes Castle which featured a couple of times as different foreground to Aurora displays
Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Banchory, Crathes, Harestone, road, Ley, farm, entrance, layby, tree, telephone, poles, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, proton, beam, column, light, unusual, rare, unique, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1990, February, 19th, slide, film, Fuji, RSP11, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, captured
 


 

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