Egypt > Luxor Nobles Tombs
Photographs in this gallery are of the various Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank if the Nile at Luxor in the area called Qurnet Murai

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Luxor Menna Tomb EG006719jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Menna Mena Scribe offering table colours details Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006720jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Menna Scribe Royal banquet eyes missing colors is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006721jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Menna Tomb Osiris Offering scenes Room ceiling walls is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006722jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Noble Menna Wife offering Osiris God food Scribe Royal Tomb Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006723jhp 
 Egypt Thebes Tomb Noble Mena Osiris seated colourful Relief God offering is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, upright, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006724jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Menna Scribe harvest farming scenes painted is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, upright, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006725jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tomb Noble Menna Wife Banquet scene Scribe Royal Tomb Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006726jhp 
 Egyptian Luxor Tomb Noble Menna Scribe Royal Tomb Reliefs walls room is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, upright, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006727jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Menna Banquet Wall covering colourful Tomb Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006728jhp 
 Egypt Thebes Noble Menna Scribe cattle Isis Horus ankh Tomb Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, upright, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006729jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tomb Mena herding Isis Horus mother unusual Anubis cattle Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. This depiction of the Goddess which I believe is Isis is very unusual with Horus on her head and I have not been able to find it elsewhere shown in my reference books or on the Internet. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, upright, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006730jhp 
 Egyptian Thebes Tombs Nobles Menna Marshland scene boat fishing fish water is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, upright, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006731jhp 
 Egyptian Luxor Noble Menna marshland fishing nets fish colours details Tomb Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, upright, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006732jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tomb Noble Menna marshland ducks ibis food hunting Relief is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG006733jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Menna colourful wine lotus flowers Tomb Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, upright, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Menna Tomb EG9410023jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Menna Wife Banquet eye damage food details Tomb Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Menna Tomb-Chapel is cruciform in design located in the Upper Enclosure [Tomb 69] was a Scribe of the Royal Fields during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 as this photo records and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs, difficult to photograph as protected by Perspex sheeting and only lit by reflected light done by the custodians. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji RDP 100asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot and nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern, as his eyes have been gouged out possibly by an enemy in ancient times. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, landscape, Menna, Mena, wife, God, Osiris, deceased, scribe, fields, recording, taxes, wheat, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 1994, Fuji, RDP, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG006712jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tomb Noble Nakht grapes treading wine fowls workers Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, upright, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG006713jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Nakht grapes wine making workmen Tomb Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, upright, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG006714jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Nakht Tomb tree Goddess Hathor food feast papyrus Colours Relief is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm
Luxor Nakht Tomb EG00672jhp 
 Egypt Luxor Tombs Nobles Nakht grapes food feast pile Tomb Colourful Reliefs is one of many beautiful tomb decorations amongst the Tombs of the Nobles on the West Bank of the River Nile at Luxor. The Nakht Tomb-Chapel is located in the Village area [Tomb 52] was the Astronomer of Amun during the reign of Thutmosis 1V around 1400BC. This was one of the first Tombs of the Nobles I visited in 1994 and I was taken immediately by the colourful painted reliefs but difficult to photograph as the lighting was extremely limited and only properly lit small areas of a scene. The area around the Tombs has now been greatly improved with removal of many of the old modern houses and entry to these fascinating burial sites made more accessible. Visits to these tombs tend to be privately organised rather than being part of a package tour but it is easily organised with a taxi from the East Bank hotels, payment for selected tombs is made at the ticket office beforehand near the Colossi of Memnon with the area being very close to the ticket office.

Photography certainly the last time I was in Egypt in 2007 had been banned in all the tombs so these photos although not very good technically are useful as a record of the nature of the tombs and especially their paintings. These images have not been sharpened during post production but will benefit from some USM sharpening prior to use. Hand held as no tripods were allowed and using slide film, Fuji 400asa, did not give great leeway to get decent photos, oh for my Nikon DSLR with 6400ISO. In this case I remember using a 80B Blue filter to try to counteract the very low grade tungsten lighting and because of the speed loss was using my 50mm f1.8 Nikkor lens wide open so had absolutely no Depth of Field to play with and a shutter speed of 30th second or less-really impossible to produce technically good images. 
The hand reflected lighting used in some tombs causes a hot spot so nothing by way of a balanced light but it is daylight balanced. However being direct sunlight reflected off tin foil would probably being doing more damage to the paintings than a suitable wide angle flash with UV filter. Given that most of the paints used in these tombs is mineral based then actually either method would do no measurable damage. The Perspex sheeting, however inconvenient, and not a problem from memory in Nakht’s Tomb, is to stop the physical touching of the paintings accidentally or otherwise, by inquisitive hands or swinging backpacks, and is absolutely vital protection to preserve these invaluable unique irreplaceable paintings. Some of the obvious damage to the paintings is not all modern. 
 Keywords: Egypt, Egyptian, ancient, Luxor, Tombs, Nobles, Thebes, River Nile, West Bank, Old Qurna, Sheikh Abd’el-Qurna, village, landscape, Nakht, wife, Tawi, Taui, God, Amun, deceased, Observer, Hours, astronomer, tomb, banquet, scene, painting, Tree, Goddess, Hathor, fruit-tree, headdress, sycamore, grapes, offering, fish, ducks, food, flowers, lotus, bread, loaves, wine, fishing, marshland, boats, agriculture, cattle, farming, girls, workers, colourful, colorful, colours, colors, painted, natural, light, 2000, Fuji, RHP, 80a, tungsten, filter, slide, film, scanned, scan, daylight, balanced, Nikon, FM2, 35mm

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