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Scotland > Historic Properties > Peel of Lumphanan fgh2454jhp
This gallery has photographs of Scottish Castles and Fortresses, Stately Homes and Gardens, old churches or kirks and includes most of the following:
Auchindoir Church; Auchindoun Castle; Balmoral Castle; Balvenie Castle; Bass of Inverurie; Bellabeg Motte; Braemar Castle; Brodie Castle; Castle Fraser; Corgarff Castle; Corrichie Monument; Corse O’Neil Castle; Craigellachie Bridge; Crathes Castle; Crathie Kirk; Dalgetie Castle; Deer Abbey; Drum Castle; Duff House; Duffus Castle; Dunnideer; Dunnottar Castle; Elgin Cathedral; Esslemont Castle; Fasque House; Fetternear House; Findlater; Fordyce; Fyvie Castle; Gairnshiel Bridge; Glenbuchat Castle; Haddo House; Hallforest Castle; Huntly Castle; Inchdrewer Castle; Invercauld Bridge O’Dee; Kildrummy Castle; Kincardine O’Neil Kirk; Kindrochit Castle; Kinloss Abbey; Kinneff Church; Knock Castle; Leith Hall; Mar Lodge; Marnoch Kirkyard; Mid Mar Kirk; Monymusk Kirk; Peel of Lumphanan; Pitmedden Gardens; Pluscarden Priory or Abbey; Ruthven Barracks; Slains Castle; Tolquhon Castle; Tullich Kirk; Fort George;
Peel of Lumphanan fgh2454jhp 
 Deeside Lumphanan Peel entrance motte mound summer Scottish path Aberdeenshire located to the west of the village of Lumphanan. The village has historical connections with a cairn to the death of Macbeth in the woods nearby in 1057 as well as this 12th Century Peel signifying its strategic importance associated with ancient drove roads and various passes from the flat lands of Deeside northwards into Strathdon and the lands of Northern Aberdeenshire. The original defences are now held to be turf ramparts rather than a palisade and the large outer wall was found to be 18th century agricultural work rather than original barricades creating a moat. On the top of the large flat area is the foundation outline of a rectangular Halton House dating to the 15th century. A small car parking area is available for the visitor and there is a very informative information board provided by Historic Scotland. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, village, Lumphanan, Peel, motte, fort, castle, Norman, medieval, earthwork, 13th Century, Durward’s, Halton, House, foundations, 15th Century, Perk, hill, summer, trees, landscape, countryside, rural, sun, sunshine, blue, sky, clouds, mount, cairn, MacBeth, death, battle, woods, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, photo, photograph, 2013, August
© Jim Henderson
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Photographer: Jim Henderson
Collection: Historic Properties
Filename:
Peel of Lumphanan fgh2454jhp
Upload Date: Saturday, August 10, 2013
Photo Size: 12.5 MB; 5325x3543 pixels
Preview:
  comp 600 x 399

Caption:

Deeside Lumphanan Peel entrance motte mound summer Scottish path Aberdeenshire

located to the west of the village of Lumphanan. The village has historical connections with a cairn to the death of Macbeth in the woods nearby in 1057 as well as this 12th Century Peel signifying its strategic importance associated with ancient drove roads and various passes from the flat lands of Deeside northwards into Strathdon and the lands of Northern Aberdeenshire. The original defences are now held to be turf ramparts rather than a palisade and the large outer wall was found to be 18th century agricultural work rather than original barricades creating a moat. On the top of the large flat area is the foundation outline of a rectangular Halton House dating to the 15th century. A small car parking area is available for the visitor and there is a very informative information board provided by Historic Scotland.
Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, village, Lumphanan, Peel, motte, fort, castle, Norman, medieval, earthwork, 13th Century, Durwards, Halton, House, foundations, 15th Century, Perk, hill, summer, trees, landscape, countryside, rural, sun, sunshine, blue, sky, clouds, mount, cairn, MacBeth, death, battle, woods, D700, Nikon, DSLR, digital, photo, photograph, 2013, August
 


 

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