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Searching all stock for "heatheryhaugh":

Aurora over Scotland (32 files)

Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights displays photographed taken over Aberdeeshire in Scotland since 1989 covering some 350 events with arc, rays, coronas with a wide rnage of shapes and colours
Aurora Glen Dye au61041jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis underexposed grainy rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an underexposed example while bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610415jhp 
 Scottish Aurora display Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example with an exposure near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610410jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red 645 medium format autumn 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji RHP 400asa 6.4.5cm format film and it became visible just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa medium format transparency film of which this photo is an example and bracketing exposures near the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. In this case I used the 40mm f4 Zenzanon on my Bronica ETRS. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure as in this case. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji film, usually Velvia or RAP, I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, slide, transparency, film, Fuji, RHP, 400asa, pushed, development, 1600asa, 645mm, time, exposure, Bronica, ETRS, wide, angle, lens, Zenzanon, 40mm, f4, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61058jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display ray single Plough Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61054jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint multiple rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610536jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis rays red clouds moving shapes Aberdeenshire autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the end of my first film, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610535jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye strong rays red clouds patterns autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610533jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Northern Lights display rays red clouds stars autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610531jhp 
 Scotland photo Aurora Borealis display rays pink clouds windy shapes autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61052jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye overexposed rays trailing stars red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610527jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis night sky strong multiple rays red Arc autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610526jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Glen Dye many strong bright rays red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, upright, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610525jhp 
 Scottish active Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays large red clouds autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610524jhp 
 Scotland Merry Dancers display rays red stars several Aurora autumn September 26th & 27th 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610523jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Glen Dye rays red long exposure clouds 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610521jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Clachnaben hill rays mulitple red autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610520jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display rays red clouds Jim Henderson Photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film, the first film I tried out, and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61051jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye rays clouds first photo autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo was the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible and some rays visible through the gaps. This was probably an underexposure, maybe 10 seconds or so. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610517jhp 
 Aberdeenshire Aurora Borealis display Glen Dye faint rays clouds gaps autumn 26th & 27th September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display using the Fuji 400asa slide film and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible although the large brown patches are moving cloud. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I photographed using Fuji RHP 400asa, used in this photo, and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than 20 seconds incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the 400asa slide film at the lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. I found that the pushed 400asa stock was finer grained than the RSP11 which was rated at 1600asa-it was later dropped by Fuji when Provia was introduced. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617120jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis maximum bright strong display winter hills Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617119jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis Boxing Day December rays bright Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617118jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Boxing Day west rays Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, multiple, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617117jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis moving ray red headlights Boxing Day Aberdeenshire December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617115jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights multiple rays arc red yellow display 1989 Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617114jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis several rays moving arc hill starting display Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617113jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis early stage arc active Cairn O'Mount rays display Boxing Day December 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Cairn O Mount au617111jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis arc start display Aberdeenshire Jim Henderson Photograph Boxing Day December Cairn O’Mount 1989 taken from just below the Cairn O’Mount on its North face and which looks northwards towards Deeside. This photo is from the fourth Aurora Display I photographed after my first one in September and the arc started to develop from 22.00 hrs UT onwards. I felt that the summit of the Cairn would be a good vantage point and offer uncluttered views northwards. It was a good light pollution free viewpoint but apart from an occasional passing car, headlights a headache during an exposure, I soon realised that it was along way to go and of course further south of and way from any displays. In some of the photos there are two small lights on the horizon which I reckoned were from a farm on the Hill of Fare several miles to the north. The single dark pole is a snow pole and on the side of the nearby hillside are snow fences. This display was a classic in terms of an Arc, waxing and waning until it reached a point of no return when single and then multiple burst upwards from the arc as well as moving quite rapidly from right to left; East to West. Generally the colour was a pale whitish/yellow colour with a hint of red in some of the rays.

The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the first display I saw. Later tips helped until I started to park at a favourite viewpoint every clear night over the forthcoming years, the days before the Internet, and just watch the night sky.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet and aware that exposures much longer than that incurred the affect of star trail so instead of sharp dots for stars they became lines. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au61065jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis display Clachnaben hill torr Glen Dye autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, upright, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610615jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis Glen Dye red purple gas September 1989 slide film taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610613jhp 
 Scotland Aurora Borealis red display Glen Dye earliest first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610612jhp 
 Scottish Aurora Borealis display Plough stars Glen Dye Aberdeenshire first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured
Aurora Glen Dye au610611jhp 
 Scotland Northern Lights Ursa Major red rays display Glen Dye earliest first autumn September 1989 taken from Heatheryhaugh just above steep climb out of Glen Dye on the road to the Cairn O’Mount and which looks across to Clachnaben, the notable hill with a tor rocky outcrop which makes it visible from much of Deeside when looking south. This photo is one of the first I took of an Aurora display and came just after midnight when clouds cleared and made the stars and night sky visible. The project to photograph an Aurora came after a missed opportunity earlier in the year in March with what became known as the Big Aurora, a full Corona over Deeside. I had got the idea of trying to photograph a display following on from my success in 1986 of capturing Halley’s Comet thanks to the support of the Astronomy Ian Shepherd at the Edinburgh Observatory. I had heard about the Big Aurora but had missed the display buried away in my darkroom processing B&W photos for the local newspaper. Ian suggested I contact John MacNicol, President of the Aberdeen Astronomy Society and he eventually tipped me off about the display captured here.

I took Fuji RHP 400asa and RSP 11, rated at 1600ASA, the fastest available at the time in 35mm slide film of which this photo is an example and I tried both as well as bracketing exposures around the 20 second mark based on my experiences with photographing the Comet. Instead of a telephoto lens as per the Comet, for Aurora I used my widest lens, a Nikkor 28mm with a f2.8 widest aperture. Push processing the slide film at the Fuji lab by two stops to the equivalent of 1600asa I found that an exposure around 20 second eventually gave the best results for best colour saturation and exposure and giving the maximum control of grain without it appearing washed out from underexposure. This basic arrangement eventually worked best when I moved to a DSLR Fuji S2 in 2003 with an ISO of 1600 giving comparable results to the ASA equivalent and the noise factor was akin to the grain of slide film. As I shot my general landscape work using Fuji I stayed with it for the Aurora although Kodak film was acceptable in quality and results. I felt that the Fuji film handled the reds and greens better anyway and these are in practice the primary colours of Aurora displays when oxygen is excited by the incoming electrons. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, British, North, Northern, East, Aberdeenshire, Royal, Deeside, Glen, Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, Heatheryhaugh, Clachnaben, Aurora, Borealis, Arc, Rays, Northern, Lights, Merry Dancers, landscape, photos, photographs, sunspots, solar, flares, CME, electrons, photons, storms, energy, sun, stars, oxygen, gas, Van, Allen, belt, ionosphere, flares, space, molecules, magnetic, disturbance, magnetometers, belts, radiation, purple, red, green, yellow, pink, colourful, colorful, coloured, colored, colours, colors, moon, whirls, celestial, clouds, nature, dark, nights, night-time, forest, 1989, September, December, Boxing, Day, slide, film, Fuji, RHP, RSP11, 400asa, 1600asa, 35mm, time, exposure, Nikon, FM2, wide, angle, lens, 28mm, 24mm, f2.8, scanned, scan, earliest, first, captured

Scotland > Aberdeenshire (1 file)

This gallery includes rural, scenic and landscape subjects of the Shire, including Kincardineshire, Mearns, Garioch, Buchan Strathbogie and Mar.
Clachnaben Glen Dye zxc3275jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben tor hilltop trees Scottish Kincardineshire Aberdeenshire Scotland taken from Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Charr, burn, ruin, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, heather, bell, purple, grass, walking, wild

Scotland > Rivers, Glens & Lochs (29 files)

The gallery has photographs of Scottish lochs, glens and pictures associated directly with particular rivers in Scotland such as the River Dee, Don, Feugh, Urie, Deveron, Tanar, Dye, and Glen of Dee, Glen Muick and Glenbuchat.
Glen Dye Spring bnm7010jhp 
 Glen Dye Charr Burn gorse yellow spring Scottish Aberdeenshire summer May taken on the Cairn O’Mount stretch of road just before the steep hill down to the Spital Brig, looking across to the Charr Burn and a very typical part of the grouse and deer moorland and forestry Glen Dye estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns. The road crosses over the moorlands peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with a viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile Howe of Mearns plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the very narrow single lane Spital Brig is an old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. The small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, B974, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, upright spring, summer, gorse, yellow, flowers, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2017, 3rd, May, sunshine, sunny, blue, sky, bright, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm7008jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben tor hill gorse summer heather Scotland cirrus Aberdeenshire Charr taken on the Cairn O’Mount stretch of road just before the steep hill down to the Spital Brig, looking across to the Charr Burn and a very typical part of the grouse and deer moorland and forestry Glen Dye estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns. The road crosses over the moorlands peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with a viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile Howe of Mearns plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the very narrow single lane Spital Brig is an old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. The small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, B974, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, spring, summer, gorse, yellow, flowers, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2017, 3rd, May, sunshine, sunny, blue, sky, cirrus, clouds, bright, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm7006jhp 
 Glen Dye Charr spring Cairn O'Mount road gorse moorland hills trees Scottish Aberdeenshire summer Charr taken on the Cairn O’Mount stretch of road just before the steep hill down to the Spital Brig, looking across to the Charr Burn and a very typical part of the grouse and deer moorland and forestry Glen Dye estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns. The road crosses over the moorlands peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with a viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile Howe of Mearns plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the very narrow single lane Spital Brig is an old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. The small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, B974, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, spring, summer, gorse, yellow, flowers, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2017, 3rd, May, sunshine, sunny, blue, sky, bright, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm7005jhp 
 Clachnaben tor hilltop trees Scottish Aberdeenshire spring summer Charr taken on the Cairn O’Mount stretch of road just before the steep hill down to the Spital Brig, looking across to the Charr Burn and a very typical part of the grouse and deer moorland and forestry Glen Dye estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns. The road crosses over the moorlands peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with a viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile Howe of Mearns plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the very narrow single lane Spital Brig is an old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. The small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, road, B974, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, spring, summer, gorse, yellow, flowers, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, track, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2017, 3rd, May, sunshine, sunny, blue, sky, bright, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye bnm4257jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben Heatheryhaugh hilltop larch pine trees Scotland Aberdeenshire summer part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking through the mature larch and pine forest to the snow covered Clachnaben with its distinctive tor and is the famous skyline marker for many views from Deeside or the Mearns. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, upright, cropped, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, July, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye bnm4256jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben tor hilltop larch pine trees Scottish Aberdeenshire summer taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking through the mature larch and pine forest to the snow covered Clachnaben with its distinctive tor and is the famous skyline marker for many views from Deeside or the Mearns. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, July, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye bnm4255jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben road Heatheryhaugh summer hilltop larch pine trees Scottish Aberdeenshire part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking through the mature larch and pine forest to the snow covered Clachnaben with its distinctive tor and is the famous skyline marker for many views from Deeside or the Mearns. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, July, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye bnm4254jhp 
 Glen Dye Spital road bridge narrow hills forest moorland Scotland summer Aberdeenshire sunny taken near the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, July, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye bnm4253jhp 
 Glen Dye Spital ruin hills Scotland summer forest white clouds sunny taken over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, July, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye bnm4252jhp 
 Glen Dye Spittal ruin hills trees Scottish Aberdeenshire cirrus clouds sunny taken over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, upright, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, July, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye bnm4251jhp 
 Glen Dye Spital ruin hills trees Scotland summer Aberdeenshire cirrus clouds sunny taken over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, July, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye bnm2710jhp 
 Glen Dye Charr water hills moors Scotland Aberdeenshire Spring April snow taken just above the Spital Bridge looking westwards along part of this typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, spring, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, Snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Clachnaben bnm2709jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben tor hilltop Scottish Aberdeenshire Spring April snow taken just above the Spital Bridge part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, spring, snow, white, clouds, blue, sky, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Forest bnm3015jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben larch trees fresh May spring vibrant green Scotland Aberdeenshire taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, spring, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, May, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Forest bnm3014jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben tor hilltop larch trees green Scottish Aberdeenshire Spring taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, upright, spring, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, May, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Forest bnm3012jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben tor hill larch trees fresh spring green Scottish Aberdeenshire taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, spring, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, green, fresh, vibrant, pine, grass, walking, wild, 2016, May, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm2535jhp 
 Glen Dye Spital bridge burn water Cairn O'Mount road snow spring sunny Scotland Aberdeenshire burn taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, pine, heather, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm2534jhp 
 Glen Dye Spital ruined inn drove roads snow spring sunny Scotland Aberdeenshire burn taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, upright, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, pine, heather, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm2533jhp 
 Glen Dye Spital ruin snow spring forest hills Scottish Aberdeenshire burn taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, pine, heather, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm2531jhp 
 Glen Dye Spittal ruined hospital snow April spring forest hills Scottish Aberdeenshire burn taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, upright, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, pine, heather, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm2530jhp 
 Glen Dye Spital ruin hostelry snow winter scene spring sunshine Scotland Aberdeenshire burn taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking over the old ruin by the Spital Burn which once was a ‘Spital’ or Hospital, a hostel for weary travellers either crossing the Cairn drove road or herdsmen moving cattle south to the Lowland Markets. The area had a reputation for robbers or highway men but after the railways took the main livestock to markets droving died out as did horse travelling and the roadside inn fell into ruin. Next to the Spital is a small single lane single arch bridge which has never been widened so is not liked by log lorries or coaches. There is a ruin on the other side of the Cairn O’Mount just above the Clatterin Brig which served a similar purpose and my Grandmother told me she had stayed in that hostelry when she and her new husband travelled on horse and trap from Montrose to Banchory in the late 1800’s. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, pine, heather, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm2529jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben tor hilltop trees Scottish Aberdeenshire Spring snow 2016 taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking through the mature larch and pine forest to the snow covered Clachnaben with its distinctive tor and is the famous skyline marker for many views from Deeside or the Mearns. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, pine, heather, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm2528jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben tor hill snow larch pines trees Scottish Aberdeenshire April 2016 taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking through the mature larch and pine forest to the snow covered Clachnaben with its distinctive tor and is the famous skyline marker for many views from Deeside or the Mearns. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, upright, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, pine, heather, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm2527jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben hilltop larch pine April Scotland Aberdeenshire Spring snow taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking through the mature larch and pine forest to the snow covered Clachnaben with its distinctive tor and is the famous skyline marker for many views from Deeside or the Mearns. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, pine, heather, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Glen Dye Spring bnm2526jhp 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben tor hilltop through trees Scottish Spring April snow crop taken near Heatheryhaugh part of a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. Looking through the mature larch and pine forest to the snow covered Clachnaben with its distinctive tor and is the famous skyline marker for many views from Deeside or the Mearns. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Cairn, O’Mount, Clachnaben, hill, Heatheryhaugh, landscape, summer, water, Dye, Spital, Spittal, Charr, burn, ruin, hospital, hostel, hotel, inn, bridge, bracken, rocks, tor, rocky, outcrop, trees, moorland, forest, larch, pine, heather, grass, walking, wild, 2016, April, snow, sunshine, sunny, digital, camera, DSLR, Nikon, D700
Heather Moorland UP673856JHP 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben Heather Heatheryhaugh Rowan Scottish Photo Aberdeenshire Scotland a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Clachnaben, hill, landscape, Heatheryhuagh, heather, purple, calluna, vulgaris, summer, Dye, rocks, trees, rowan, pine, moorland, forest, grass, walking, wild
Heather Calluna Vulgaris UP673873JHP 
 Glen Dye Scottish Heather Calluna Vulgaris Purple Photo Summer Clachnaben viewed from on a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Clachnaben, hill, heather, calluna, vulgaris, upright, summer, water, Dye, Heatheryhaugh, trees, moorland, forest, grass, walking, wild
Glen Dye Heather UP673872JHP 
 Glen Dye Scottish Heather Moor Vulgaris Aberdeenshire Scotland Clachnaben Heatheryhaugh located on a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Clachnaben, hill, landscape, Heatheryhaugh, heather, vulgaris, purple, summer, water, Dye, bracken, rocks, trees, moorland, forest, grass, walking, wild
Clachnaben Heather UP673870JHP 
 Glen Dye Clachnaben Hill Tor Heather Purple Summer Scottish Aberdeenshire a typical moorland and forestry estate located between Banchory on Royal Deeside and Fettercairn in Mearns crossed over the highland peaking at the Cairn O’Mount with viewpoint for views southwards to the coast near Montrose and the whole of the flat fertile plain south as far as Dundee. 
 Keywords: Scotland, Scottish, Grampian, Aberdeenshire, Kincardineshire, Banchory, Fettercairn, Mearns, Royal, Deeside, Glen Dye, Clachnaben, hill, landscape, heather, purple, summer, water, Dye, Heatheryhaugh, burn, brachen, rocks, trees, moorland, forest, grass, walking, wild

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